2011-10-13 / Columns

Looking Back

120 YEARS AGO

The St. Ignace News

Saturday, October 10, 1891

The diphtheria scare is ended at Cheboygan.

•••

Our meat markets are being kept well supplied with deer meat.

•••

Geo. Cooke expects to spend the winter in the lumber woods, cooking.

•••

The steamer Hunter, of the North Shore Line, now makes only two trips a week. A weekly trip to Traverse City is the cause.

•••

Among those who attended the races at Grand Rapids last Thursday, were Thos. Dolan and Mike Hoban.

•••

It is rumored that a professor from the Soo will organize a class here and make weekly visits, giving instructions on the guitar.

•••

While in the southern part of the state P. W. Hombach purchased a fine team of colts. “Billy” Sullivan will break them in.

•••

E. Sherwood visited the races at Grand Rapids this week.

•••

The Cheboygan News says that the Republican is responsible for the outrageous stories circulated in regards to diphtheria being at that place.

•••

Official

Common council Proceedings

Council Chamber, Oct. 6th, 1891

Moved by Ald. McArthur and supported by Ald. Mulcrone, that the street committee be instructed to have Mary street graded in front of J. Mc- Clintock’s and in front of J. Chambers & Bros. buildings so that sidewalks can be laid property on said Mary street. Carried.

On motion of Ald. Fritschen which was duly supported that the city marshal be instructed to notify Mr. Conrad

Orth to have his barn removed off of the premises known as the Chambers alley. Carried.

Moved and supported that the mayor and city attorney be authorized to enter into a contract with some electric plant company – home company preferred, to light the city with an electric light system. Carried.

•••

Allerton, the Iowa stallion, won the race at Grand Rapids Thursday.

•••

A large yellow dog was run over by the cars one day this week in the rear of Pat Gallagher’s meat market and was killed.

•••

Jesse H. Warren and C. H. Wilber were out hunting the first of the week and brought in a deer. They didn’t buy it either.

•••

Died. – At 3 o’clock Thursday morning, of cholera infantum, Albert W., only child of Mr. and Mrs. Ray E. Boynton, aged six weeks.

•••

The average public school attendance daily in St. Ignace since the beginning of the term is 409, and the average per cent of attendance is 95.

•••

A large party of sportsmen from Mackinac Island passed through the city this morning on their way to Epoufette, where they will hunt for a week.

•••

The steamer Faxton has discontinued running between Cheboygan and Sault Ste. Marie, and is now engaged in carrying wood from Cross Village to Mackinac Island.

•••

Jas. J. Brown will have charge of “Ticket of Leave Man,” which will be presented to the people of St. Ignace some time in the near future by the St. Ignace Dramatic Co.

•••

Someone will surely get hurt if the authorities allow the shooting of wild ducks in the bay to continue. There has been more or less shooting going on all week, and in one case a rifle was being used.

•••

The Watchman office plant was transferred this week from the building adjoining the gymnasium to the hall over this office, the editor having purchased the same some weeks ago. This office has one of the best equipped job departments of any office in the u.p.

•••

In Postmaster General Wanamaker’s next report he will discuss penny postage, free delivery in small towns and postal telegraph. He will give facts not only as to lowering the rate of postage, but will defend free delivery and strongly urge the post telegraph scheme.

•••

The Chicago Inter-Ocean, in commenting on the accident to the steamer Omaha, says, Had the lightship ordered by the government for Grey’s Reef been in place, the Omaha would not have stranded on that dangerous spot. The lightships were to have been in place months ago, but they have been delayed. The loss on the Omaha would have paid for half the cost of the one for Grey’s Reef.

•••

Dr. Campbell attended the Grand Rapids races.

•••

The schooner Wm. Young sank in the straits Monday.

•••

John Early and James Gallagher of Mackinac Island were in the city this week.

•••

Messrs Arnold, Gallagher and Early, of Mackinac Island, attended the races at Grand Rapids last Thursday.

•••

P. Murray dug 320 bushels of potatoes out of his garden on State street this season. He also has a head of cabbage which measures 17 inches across the heart.

•••

The A. Booth Packing Co. expects to transfer all their business to Whitefish Point, Lake Superior. Their catch this season would not warrant them staying in this section.

•••

The steamer Chas. West has pulled off the Les Cheneaux route and will go on the North Shore route, relieving the tug Grayling, which goes to Lake Erie to engage in the fish business.

•••

The schooner Sachem, ore laden, ran aground on Gull Island last Monday, and by lightering a portion of her cargo and with the assistance of the tug Leviathan and the Algomah she was released Tuesday.

•••

J. M. French, proprietor of the Grand Central Hotel at Cheboygan, was in the city Tuesday on his way to the Island. The object of his visit to that place was to inspect the Mission House furniture with a view to purchasing same. He did not buy, however, as the condition of the household goods was not to his taste.

•••

Considerable excitement was created in the city yesterday when Ronald Rankin returned from a hunt and related the following bear story: In tramping through the woods in quest of small game about one quarter of a mile from the court house I was brought to a sudden halt by hearing what one would naturally suppose to be the tread of a cow or a horse. The underbrush being quite think I was not able to see far in advance, so seated myself in a comfortable position and awaited results. Imagine my surprise when a few moments later I saw a large black bear come from the brush and walk directly towards me. Hiding myself behind a clump of bushes I allowed bruin to come out in the clearing when I emptied the contents of a double barreled shot gun in his head. A nod of surprise and a quickened pace was the only result noted.

•••

The Cheboygan Tribune of the 8 says: “Since the exit of cottage owners at Mackinac island a number of the cottages have been burglarized, and many articles stolen... Suspicion was...attracted to the soldiers at the fort, and the officers made an examination and found some of the plunder among the effects of their subordinates. Two of them were in Cheboygan yesterday and Marshal McGinn was telegraphed to arrest. He captured one last night and the other this morning. Deputy Sheriff Franks came over on a tug last night and returned this morning with both prisoners.

80 YEARS AGO

The Republican-News

Saturday, October 10, 1931

William Lounsbury was fatally injured at about 1:00 o’clock Sunday morning when an automobile in which he was riding skidded around the Morneau corner and crashed into a tree in the Voce Cottage yard. Raymond LaLonde, driver of the car, was only slightly hurt and was out and about Sunday.

The two boys were driving to a dance at Carp River and approached the sharp curve at a very high speed.

•••

The ladies of the Third ward have organized a sewing circle in which they will make over all old clothes they can secure, to fit some destitute child. Mrs. Chester Wing, chairman of the Third Ward Child’s Welfare organization, is chairman of the sewing circle, and says the ladies will meet once a week.

•••

The St. Ignace common council on Monday night officially set the date for turning city clocks back to Central Standard (“slow”) time as Sunday, October 11, at 12 o’clock, midnight. St. Ignace has been on “fast time” since May 9.

This action came to many as abrupt. That the agitation for a return to slow time was this active was not evident to many. It had generally been held that St. Ignace, because of the state ferries and it being a train and bus service terminal, would delay definite action until the state’s hearing before the Interstate Commerce Commission that will take place next week, Thursday.

However, the change has come. Many will welcome it. Especially those early risers who would, under the present time, be up nearly two hours before daylight. The change will mean that they will have to wait but one hour for daylight.

•••

In August last, it will be remembered that a diamond ring was reported lost in Nicholson’s restaurant. A lady thought she had left the ring in the wash room, and the state police were called in to investigate one person who was known to have passed into the wash room just afterwards. This person, however, was able to give such proofs of unassailable respectability that she was passed without further questioning, and the disappearance of the diamond ring remained a mystery.

The other day Mr. Nicholson received a letter, dated October 5, written on the stationery of Saint Aloysius Rectory, Detroit, Mich., and signed by Rev. (Father) George E. Montie in which the priest states:

“Dear Sir – A diamond ring has been turned over to me. It was found in your establishment in August. The owner lives in Cadiz, Ohio, but I do not know her name. I was told to write to you for the name. You will greatly oblige me by sending me that information in order that the ring may be returned.”

•••

From Mackinac Island: By request of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, all schools of the state are to be given a name that shall have suitable historic or other significance. St. Ignace, our county seat, has such a name for its central high school, and none could be more locally fitting than LaSalle.

Complying with the request, the Mackinac Island Board of Education has gone into the past history of the Island and chosen a name interwoven in the history of the educational, religious and efforts of uplift of the past, since the early days of the nineteenth century, and has conferred the name of Thomas W. Ferry upon the Mackinac Island public schools.

Thomas White Ferry was born in the southwest corner of the west wing of the Old Mission House in the spring of 1826. Later, Mr. Ferry rose to be U. S. senator for Michigan and on March 11, 1873, introduced in the U. S. senate the resolution that set apart the Island national park.

The lot upon which the Mackinac Island schools stands was a part of the military reservation that the Island constituted, and was used as the Government pay office, to pay the Indians. Then, after the erection of the National Park, and the accompanying setting aside of certain lots for various purposes, the old government pay office site and building was given to the Island for the public school.

We are told that parts of the original government building, that stood on the site, are incorporated in the present school building.

•••

From Gould City School News: Our art exhibit at the county fair won nine dollars in prizes. With this money we have purchased two framed pictures and some indoor baseball equipment.

•••

From Hessel: Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Casey have closed the Hessel Inn and gone to the Soo for the winter months.

•••

We had two ears of corn brought in by Roy Abbe, on display in our front window last week. Tuesday morning we noticed that one ear was missing and every kernel taken from the other – the work of rats.

80 YEARS AGO

St. Ignace Enterprise

Thursday, October 15, 1931

517 Children Treated for Dental Relief. This is a report by three months’ work done by Dr. Allshouse in this county. Clinics were located in three central places – six weeks in Engadine; two weeks in Cedarville, and four weeks in St. Ignace.

That this service was given to Mackinac county and the success of the summer Relief program was due to the efforts and interest of the Dental Advisory Committee and the County Child Welfare Committee.

The service was offered only to children whose parents were unable to pay for dental service at the present time.

Lists were handed in by members of the Child Welfare Committee and these lists were checked by the Dental Advisory Committee, composed of Mr. C. E. Langdon, Mr. M. Hoban, Dr. L. E. Murray, Dr. F. E. Dunster, Mrs. J. H. Ostrander, Mr. James Mc- Graw, Mr. Alvin Hossack, Mrs. Geo. Dunn. Responsibility for giving the children appointments rested with the Child Welfare Committee in their respective districts. In many instances these members transported the children in their own cars to the clinic centers, otherwise these children could not have received the attention.

•••

In the seventh and deciding game of the world’s baseball series, played in St. Louis Saturday, the St. Louis Cardinals, National League champions, won from Connie Mack’s American League Athletics of Philadelphia 4-2.

•••

Capt. Hyatt of the D. & C. steamer Eastern States, has purchased a lot through Fred Barker at Pte. LaBarbe on which he is erecting a four-room log cabin. Mr. Barker is of the opinion that a Detroit colony at the Point will result form Capt. Hyatt’s beginning and that the Boulevard Drive will be a scene of building activity next year.

•••

Princess Watassa, health envoy of the Michigan Tuberculosis Association will take the warpath against ill health when she appears before children in Mackinac county schools beginning Monday, October 19. She will spend ten school days from October 19 to 30 in the country teaching health lessons to the pupils.

Watassa, whose name means “bearer of happiness,” is beginning her fourth year of health work among Michigan school children. With Indian legends, many centuries old, she impresses the students with the importance of regular health habits, such as bathing, sleeping long hours, eating proper foods, and getting sufficient fresh air and sunshine.

The highly symbolic costume which she wears at her lectures increase the interest children express in the Princess’ appearance. As a member of the Chippewa tribe, Princess Watassa wears the full Indian dress, consisting of buckskin dress, moccasins, head-dress, and necklace.

•••

There are three tons of game fish to a mile in the St. Marys River if the number taken from a two-mile stretch in the West Neebish Cut is any indication of the river’s finny population.

•••

A man out of a job asked his friend who owned a circus for something to do.

“Well,” said the circus man, “the gorilla died the other day, and if you want to get into his skin, swing on the trapeze, growl a bit and amuse the children, you can have the job.”

The new gorilla filled the bill well, until one day he lost his grip on the trapeze and was catapulted into the lion’s den.

The lion let out a lusty roar and charged. The make-believe gorilla backed into a corner and yelled, “Halp! Halp!”

The lion thereupon came close and said in a hoarse whisper: “Shut up, you damphool, you ain’t the only guy that’s been out of a job!”

•••

From Brevort: Fred Luepnitz had a narrow escape from injury or death Friday morning. He was tending his father’s steer to pasture with a staff when the ferocious animal broke loose from the staff and made a dash for Fred, who was obliged to run for his life and barely made the fence and over before the steer struck.

It is too bad that a moving picture could not have been taken of Howard Johnson as he attempted to ride one of the horses recently purchased by M. T. Johnson at an auction sale at the Soo. The scene would rival a western screen act. No sooner had Fred mounted than the horse began to rear, kick and buck until the rider was thrown off for a considerable distance, fortunately without serious injury.

•••

P. J. Mertaugh, who last week finished his Cheboygan contract with the satisfaction of all concerned, has removed his outfit to The Snows, the tug Edna A. doing the towing.

•••

A deer swam from Bois Blanc island to near Mackinaw City Friday and lost itself in the woods, apparently unharmed.

•••

From Mackinac Island: Capt. Wm. Shepler of Mackinaw city spent a few days of last week here with his fishing boat.

A new dray line is now in operation. The proprietors are James McIntyre and Carl Couchois. They are prepared to do light and heavy hauling, prompt and efficient service. Orville Steele is general traffic manager.

The Island is a very quiet spot these evenings, society being at its lowest ebb. There are no picture shows and very few dances. The only recent social affair was a dance at the home of Sam Green on Friday evening.

•••

From Cedarville: A large boathouse is being constructed on the property of The Snows hotel, which is owned by Joseph Krause. Contractor J. A. Griffin has the building job.

Fred Nordquist and John Nordquist drove to DeTour Sunday. The latter is engineer on the tug Russia.

•••

From Allenville: Joe Baker had his car badly smashed one night last week when another driver mistook Joe’s care for a train’s headlight. Pretty poor excuse.

We don’t see anything of John Luepnitz any more. Well, he is an old married man now, so who cares if we don’t see him.

With potatoes at 35c a bushel, pressed hay at $8 a ton, flax seed at a dollar a bushel, beef at 6c a pound, pork at 7c and everything at half price of last year, how are we going to live and pay taxes. The state ferries don’t charge anything for loads coming across the straits to flood the U. P. with everything we grow, but they charge men and women passengers 25c each, but a truck with five tons on it comes free. That’s business, isn’t it?

Roy Langdon made a trip to Gould City Sunday afternoon and on his return in the evening was held up for half an hour this side of Rexton by four large buck deer fighting in the road. I think the game wardens should patrol the roads at this season of the year in order to keep the deer off the roads.

50 YEARS AGO

The Republican-News and St. Ignace Enterprise

Thursday, October 12, 1961

The St. Ignace Saints could do no wrong last Friday night as they ran all over the Cheboygan Chiefs 42-6 during the annual Homecoming affair.

•••

St. Ignace Laundromat, operated by Mr. and Mrs. Ray Christianson, will be considerably expanded before next season rolls around.

The owners have engaged Contractor Roy A. Carlson to commence footings this week for a new 40x70 concrete block building to house the enlarged facilities.

Razing of the former Wickman building now owned by the Christiansons will provide adequate parking facilities. The new building will be on a lot in back of that property and in back of the state garage.

The Laundromat now occupies a Mulcrone building in the block between the railway tracks and Mc- Cann St. and will be moved from that property.

•••

It’s not the scrap heap for the Ste. Marie, ice-breaking railway carferry which has been an auxiliary ship to the larger Chief Wawatam since 1913.

Captain Charles Closs, with a crew recruited between here and Alpena, left Tuesday afternoon for Ashtabula, Ohio, where she will be fitted for service on a route across lake Erie.

Captain M. J. Bishop of the Mackinac Transportation Co. said that the vessel had been purchased by Luria Bros. of Cleveland, Ohio. She is taken to Ashtabula where she will be placed on a run across lake Erie to the Canadian port of Port Burrell, on the Erie north shore. Capt. Bishop did not say what type of cargo the vessel would move, nor did he disclose a purchase price, but seemed happy that the vessel still would be in service.

The ship is not the original Sainte Marie, which was built in 1893 to supplement the St. Ignace. The original was a reinforced wooden craft. However, her engines were used in the new Ste. Marie.

Utilized largely as an auxiliary to the Chief Wawatam, a vessel launched in 1911, the Ste. Marie was called into regular service during the wars, for winter-time hauling of automobiles for the state ferry service; and on several occasions, to break out her sister ship from ice floes and also to open navigation on the Great Lakes and St. Marys river.

During the winter of 1922, both the chief and Ste. Marie had difficulty with ice, the chief encased near Mackinaw City for nearly a week with 160 passengers aboard. The Ste. Marie became marooned in a rescue attempt.

Again in 1937 when the Chief was ice bound off Graham Shoals, the Ste. Marie came to the rescue. Both craft were jammed and it took a fleet of several ships to aid the Ste. Marie in loosening the Chief.

Moving of the smaller of the two railway ferries leaves only the Chief Wawatam to provide year-round railway carferry service across the Straits of Mackinac.

•••

Interested citizens are invited to attend a public hearing on the transfer of St. Ignace public school property from Moran township to St. Ignace city...The transfer involves the new high school site.

•••

A new market for hemlock bark, once used in leather tanneries, was unearthed this summer by Fern Barrett of Newberry, lumber producer.

It consists of the playgrounds of Chicago.

“Years ago the bark of hemlock was a lumbering by-product which produced considerable income,” explained

Barrett. “Tanning mills used it to tan leather soles. Now ‘leather’ soles have given way for the most part to synthetic materials.

“Last summer a Chicago firm brought up a hammer-mill to grind up our hemlock bark,” he continued. “This type of mills is that sort of pestle and mortar affair that pounds the material to pieces.

“The finely pounded bark was loaded into trucks and taken to Chicago for spreading on the playgrounds...

“Big point about this surface,” Barrett added, “is that when a youngster falls and suffers an abrasion, the wound is instantly disinfected. It seems that there is just enough creosote and similar properties in the ground bark that it serves as a type of disinfectant.”

•••

What might be termed a relatively small decrease in comparison with other barometers of the tourist industry here was noted in the second annual report of the city parking lots.

Alderman Glenn W. Law of the Parking committee has filed his annual report with City Clerk Virginia M. Olmstead, showing that the city received a total of $20,619 from parking fees this season as against $23,571 last year. This is revenue from State Docks 1 and 2 leased to the city by the Michigan State Waterways commission.

The city’s share of the receipts this year will be considerably less than last year when the commission received 25 percent of the gross. This year the city is paying 50 per cent to the commission ($10,309.50) to help finance construction of a marina at Dock 2.

•••

Sam Nettleton of Pickford was in town last Friday and enjoyed visiting with old friends.

•••

When the new St. Mary’s river bridge opens for traffic on Nov. 1, 1962, a 74-year-old ferry service across the river, the International Transit Co., will cease operations. The Ontario government has bought the ferry company and all its assets for $1,650,000 and will liquidate the service when the bridge opens.

•••

The former Philip Case property on Huron street has been purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Steiner of Petoskey through Blake J. Small, local real estate broker. The Steiners have five children. He is the local representative for Bunny Bread.

Return to top


Click here for digital edition
2011-10-13 digital edition