2012-09-20 / News

Barn History Connects Families



Two families with ties to a century-old barn south of Mackinaw City gathered at the site of the barn on Labor Day. Josh Schmalzried (from left), Jack Schmalzried (front), Scott Schmalzried, Jake Schmalzried, Dean Schmalzried, Phil Schmalzried, Lael Schmalzried, and John Conrad “Jack” Schmalzried presents Martin Jahn (far right) with a photograph of the barn behind them as it was being constructed in 1898. The Schmalzried and Jahn families met September 3 at the structure on Schmalzried Road near Carp Lake west of US-31 to celebrate the connection between the owners and the descendants of the barn builders. Mr. Jahn, of Cheboygan, attended the gathering because his great-grandfather, George Fornwald, supervised the barn building more than 100 years ago. Mr. Jahn and his wife, Pat, are fascinated by northern Michigan history. They own a lighthouse on Bois Blanc Island. Bill Marvin, president of the Mackinaw Area Historical Society, organized the reunion of families after matching the photograph of the barn raising with the existing barn. He hopes to hang a picture of the outbuilding at Heritage Village in Mackinaw City. Mr. Marvin and his wife, Danna, were present, as was Frederick Gray of the historical society and around a dozen Schmalzried family members. (Photograph by Frederick Gray.) Two families with ties to a century-old barn south of Mackinaw City gathered at the site of the barn on Labor Day. Josh Schmalzried (from left), Jack Schmalzried (front), Scott Schmalzried, Jake Schmalzried, Dean Schmalzried, Phil Schmalzried, Lael Schmalzried, and John Conrad “Jack” Schmalzried presents Martin Jahn (far right) with a photograph of the barn behind them as it was being constructed in 1898. The Schmalzried and Jahn families met September 3 at the structure on Schmalzried Road near Carp Lake west of US-31 to celebrate the connection between the owners and the descendants of the barn builders. Mr. Jahn, of Cheboygan, attended the gathering because his great-grandfather, George Fornwald, supervised the barn building more than 100 years ago. Mr. Jahn and his wife, Pat, are fascinated by northern Michigan history. They own a lighthouse on Bois Blanc Island. Bill Marvin, president of the Mackinaw Area Historical Society, organized the reunion of families after matching the photograph of the barn raising with the existing barn. He hopes to hang a picture of the outbuilding at Heritage Village in Mackinaw City. Mr. Marvin and his wife, Danna, were present, as was Frederick Gray of the historical society and around a dozen Schmalzried family members. (Photograph by Frederick Gray.)

The barn builders take a break during construction in 1898. A sawmill in Cecil Bay cut the wood siding for the building. Today, the 114-year-old barn stands on Scott Schmalzried’s property. The structure is still used for storage of hay bales and haying equipment, and it contains a silo. Schmalzried family members have owned the barn for multiple generations. Phil, Jack, and Scott Schmalzried discussed the barn’s history and style when the group came together September 3 at the invitation of the Mackinaw Area Historical Society. (Photograph courtesy of Scott Schmalzried.) The barn builders take a break during construction in 1898. A sawmill in Cecil Bay cut the wood siding for the building. Today, the 114-year-old barn stands on Scott Schmalzried’s property. The structure is still used for storage of hay bales and haying equipment, and it contains a silo. Schmalzried family members have owned the barn for multiple generations. Phil, Jack, and Scott Schmalzried discussed the barn’s history and style when the group came together September 3 at the invitation of the Mackinaw Area Historical Society. (Photograph courtesy of Scott Schmalzried.)

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