2016-11-17 / Columns

Looking Back

125 YEARS AGO

The St. Ignace News

Saturday, November 21, 1891

The proposition from the Barrel Stave Factory people arrived Thursday night and was considered, accepted and signed by the Citizens’ Committee yesterday. Supt. Cook will commence work Monday making necessary repairs to the buildings and machinery and expects to be able to blow the whistle and start the machinery in motion about the 1st of January. All will rejoice at the prompt and favorable action of the committee and join The News in wishing the enterprise long life and prosperity.

•••

Union services will be held as usual on Thanksgiving Day. This year the place is the M. E. church. The preacher, Rev. John Ferries, and the hour, 10:30 a.m. The Thanksgiving offering that day will go to the St. Ignace branch of the National Bible Society. F. G. Truscott is Treasurer and Depository and has in his store very many varieties of bibles. Those who cannot afford to buy get them free. Others buy at cost price.

•••

The skilled workingmen who come to the United States in such large numbers from European countries would find it to their advantage to learn the English tongue and to make themselves familiar with American ways and American ideas. Unless they do this it is easy for them to be misled.

•••

When the people once thoroughly understand that in securing good roads they are adding to their wealth, comfort, and happiness there will be an era of roadmaking in the United States such as has never been witnessed on so immense a scale since the days of the Romans. The national government once undertook this work, and had it not been for the invention of the railroads the country roads of the United States would now probably be among the best in the world. But the railroads can never supply the place of good wagon roads, and the development of a system of good roads in any state will demonstrate that fact so clearly that the example would soon be followed by other states.

•••

The Alpena is due tonight, after which she will make only one more trip this season.

•••

Joe. Londraville was too ill to keep his barber shop open last evening, but is on deck as usual today.

•••

Rev. Father Rausseau, well known in this city, being pastor of the R. C. church here for some time, died at Menominee this week.

•••

J. T. Wells slaughtered and dressed 20 head of cattle at Carp River Farm this week in a day and a half and did the work in first-class style, too.

•••

Five tons of choice beef was slaughtered at the Carp River Farm this week and brought to this city yesterday, and sold to the various meat markets.

•••

The new Estey organ which the Daughters of the Good Shepherd have bought has been placed in the church and will be used for the first time tomorrow.

•••

A poor man lost his pocketbook last night or this morning. It contained about $3 in cash and some papers bearing the name of the owner. Finder will confer a favor by leaving at this office or returning to Mr. Lonsbury.

•••

A carload of cattle arrived at the Merchandise dock Thursday morning from Lexington, enroute for Gogebic. As the car had to lay here until afternoon, the man in charge thought best to let the stock out of the car for a few hours. After doing so the cattle headed for the end of the dock. The owner became alarmed and ran around a pile of coal and headed them off. Where the cattle were halted the space between the pile of coal and the edge of the dock was so narrow that in turning around five of them fell off the dock into the lake. Four of them were lassoed and towed ashore by the steamer Gazelle. The fifth swum to Hombach’s dock, a distance of a quarter of a mile, and landed there. The man in charge lost no time in reloading the cars, having arrived at the conclusion that his scheme was a poor one.

•••

A young heifer belonging to Mrs. Middleton, Furnace, was shot through the foot by some unknown person one day this week.

Miss Nellie Murray, teacher in LaSalle school, was too ill on Thursday to attend to her duties, and the children in her department had a holiday.

•••

Wm. Middleton, of the Furnace, left for Ozark Monday morning to put 1,000 yards of plaster on the walls and ceilings of the rooms of Jas. Hess’ new house.

•••

A lad named Charlie Brennan fell off the ore dock last week and struck in such a way that one of his arms was broken at the wrist and the bones protruded through the skin. Dr. Smith attended him and the sufferer is getting along well under his treatment.

•••

The Simmons’ Reef and White Shoals lightships came steaming into port last Sunday afternoon with the intention of going into winter quarters, in accordance with the first order issued by Commander Ludlow. On Monday the captain received an order to resume their stations and hang until the second of December, if possible. – Cheboygan News.

•••

Work on the electric light plant is being pushed vigorously. The frame work of the dynamo and engine house is completed and ready for the corrugated iron. The holes are all ready for the poles and some of the poles are set. The wire will be strung next week. The machinery will soon arrive and be set in motion as soon thereafter as possible. An additional light to the list published last will be placed midway between Chambers’ dock and Goudreau alley – nearly in front of the telephone “exchange.”

•••

Mr. Kozadd, a Detroit electrician, has charge of the work on the electric light plant.

•••

John Stack, with a gang of men, commenced putting up electric poles this morning.

•••

Frank Drew, of the steamer Hunter, and Miss Louise Mayville, of Scott’s Point, were married on the 19th at the Presbyterian parsonage by Rev. John Ferries.

•••

Young man when you jeer at a lady passing along the street, or haunt or startle her with your glances, does it ever occur to you that some other scoundrel might insult your sister, your wife, or in coming years your daughter, in the same infamous manner? How would you like that? Would you think it smart? Would you think it manly or an evidence of good? If so you ought to be kicked to one end of the earth and horsewhipped back again.

100 YEARS AGO
The St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, November 16, 1916

President Stannus of the Business Men’s Association has called a meeting for next Monday evening at the usual hour. Members should endeavor to so arrange their affairs to attend. The need of a strong, working association was never more felt than at the present time, and the business interests of the city should not neglect this opportunity to get in action for the winter months.

•••

The present season may break all records of the number of deer hunters to cross the straits bound for the hunting grounds of the upper peninsula. Up to and including those who crossed on the morning train Tuesday the number was 2,900 as against 1891 for the corresponding period a year ago, or an increase of 1,109. The total to cross last year was 2,188. The big season was in 1914 when the hunters from below crossing the straits numbered 3,673, 773 more than has yet crossed. But the season is young yet with 14 days or more than half of the open season to play on, so that it is not unreasonable to expect that this year will set a new record as to numbers.

•••

The Dodge party, including Mayor Marx of Detroit, passed up on the Dodge yacht, Nakomis, last week, bound for their camp near Eckerman. They will return by rail, crossing the straits on the evening of the 25th.

Senator Townsend’s party passed through the city in a special car last week. Their camp is in the vicinity of Seney.

A party of 25 business men of Petoskey went through on a special car also last week, bound for their hunting lodge near Hubbel.

The Flint River Club was finely outfitted. The party numbered 32 and besides a special Pullman they also had a baggage car of their own with everything to make their life in the woods a merry one.

•••

A treat is promised lovers of good music in the concert to be given tonight in the Methodist church by the Cary-Williams Concert Company and Jubilee Singers. This is the premier organization of Negro entertainers who have been for more than 30 years in the United States and Canada, and five years in the countries of Europe. The program will consist of plantation melodies and lullabies, sacred and secular duets, trios, quartettes and choruses, a saxophone soloist, a lyric soprano, a versatile reader and impersonator, and a metropolitan conservatory pianist. The general public is invited at the uniform price of admission, 35 cents.

•••

M. C. Coyle, superintendent of the Michigan Central railway and a mummer of the board of managers of the Mackinac Transportation Co., died at his home in Bay City Monday evening after a long illness. Mr. Coyle was well known here and at Mackinac Island, and had many Mackinac friends who will learn of his death with much sorrow.

•••

The November term of the Mackinac circuit court convened Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock with Judge Shepherd of Cheboygan presiding…

The most important case for trial on the calendar is that of Henrietta Welton against the Soo Line Railway Co. The plaintiff, who resides at Huntspur, is suing to recover damages for the loss of her home and contents, which she claims was the result of a fire set by sparks form a Soo Line engine. Mrs. Welton was alone in the house on the night of the fire, and was warned of her danger by the barking of a dog. She escaped from the building with difficulty, and was unable to save even her clothes. Mrs. Welton was the first witness after the case had been called and her testimony took up all of Tuesday and the greater portion of Wednesday. There are a large number of witnesses on both sides to be heard and it is believed the case will occupy the attention of the court the balance of the week.

•••

The shortage of freight cars is again as acute as ever and all roads are more or less balled up with freight awaiting shipment. The coal shortages is also causing much concern. The M. T. Co. is getting but a small proportion of its orders filled and has been obliged to commandeer shipments for other parties in order to keep the ferry in commission.

•••

R. Eddy Mathews of Muskegon was the first victim of the hunting season in the upper peninsula. He was hunting with his father near Big Bay when he was shot by Victor Bergh of Marquette. The young man was hurried to Marquette where he died in the baggage room while awaiting the arrival of the ambulance. The remains passed through this city Monday morning.

•••

From Brevort: Three men from Epoufette had an experience on Lake Michigan that they won’t forget. It was last Friday morning when they started out to the shoals to set gill nets. Eight miles out from shore the engine of their boat refused to horsepower. Last Friday was a day of snow and blizzards. This boat drifted all day and night. The men were almost exhausted when rescued Saturday morning. Mr. and Mrs. Sundquist, as usual, did the right thing by taking them to their home. Here they were made comfortable.

“This hospitality,” as one of them expressed it, “will never be forgotten. It’s the kind that touches the heart. I thought the end of my days had come.”

With the potatoes dug and the beggies all in the cellar we will now adjust our tired muscles to the milking stool and oil up the buggy harness.

Two of our worthy citizens engaged in a heated confab last Tuesday at Gros Cap. If the “state” had witnessed this interesting debate the “drys” would have made it by a hundred thousand stronger.

•••

From Allenville: Hay pressing is in full blast now and the crop is certainly fine and lots of it.

J. D. Erskine is back on his farm picking stone, which he says is a darn cold job, too. He desires, however, to publicly thank everyone who tried to send him to Lansing and fully appreciates the handsome vote the home county gave him.

•••

From Garnet: We seem to be unlucky about sickness. Whooping cough and measles are all around us but no known cases in town.

•••

From Caffey: There was a big dance at the Hendricks town hall last Saturday. All who attended claim they had a swell time.

•••

From Gilchrist: There are a good many hunters in town, but they don’t seem to be getting many deer.

•••

The adoption of the amendment to the constitution for state-wide prohibition does not go into effect until May 1, 1918. This means that in all of the counties not now dry under local option, the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors will be legal for 17 months and two weeks more. May 1 is the day when, by law, all barroom licenses must be renewed. So, licenses will be renewed in the old way for one year from May 1 next…

The amendment, as adopted, provides no penalty for violations. In the absence of a penalty clause, violators of prohibition could not be punished. It will, therefore, also be up to the legislature, which convenes in January next, by statute to provide for fining or imprisoning violators of prohibition; in addition to providing regulations for the sale of liquors for medical, mechanical, chemical, scientific and sacramental purposes…

The reason why the day when prohibition goes into effect was set as far ahead as May 1, 1918, is to give manufacturers, jobbers and retailers of intoxicants ample time to dispose of their stocks and fixtures.

•••

From Mackinac Island: The coast guard cutter Tuscarora dropped anchor in the harbor Friday and awaited the arrival of the coast guard cutter Morrill, which arrived in port Saturday afternoon. After having had target practice Sunday they lay until Monday awaiting orders. They both departed for Milwaukee Tuesday.

•••

From The Snows: Howard Rudd again has accepted a positon as chef in H. P. Hossack & Co.’s employ and left for camp Monday.

Robert Hamel and Fred Izzard are the two men chosen from Clark township to sit on the jury for the fall term of circuit court. They went to St. Ignace early Tuesday morning.

The Lotus has made her last trip in her for the season and the only boat we will have now is the Islander, and she will only come when she has sufficient freight to pay her for the trip.

Two weeks ago Robert Hamel and Roy Young had a rather rough trip over from St. Ignace and had the misfortune to lose overboard a 225-gallon tank of gasoline. The boys made up their minds a couple of days later to make a search for it and after searching the shores for miles had the good luck to find it unharmed and full on Burnt island.

The Consolidated Lumber Co., composed of Gordon H. Rudd, Robert P. Hamel and Lee Young, have purchased a tract of timber at Bushes Bay, built a set of camps and began lumbering. At a business meeting held last week Gordon Rudd was elected president, Robert Hamel, secretary, and Lee Young, foreman. Lee has moved his family to camp and will board the men.

•••

C. H. Hopkins of the Snows, who with Mrs. Hopkins is enjoying a vacation to lower Michigan cities, writes The Enterprise from Battle Creek. He says in part:

“In this part of the state there was more interest in prohibition than in the presidency. People did not care much as between Hughes and Wilson. They seemed to feel that while they preferred one of the candidates, the country would not go to the dogs with either one. But on the prohibition issue there is no doubt now how the people of the state feel about that. Some day we will wonder why we did not go it sooner.”

•••

The county clerk has thus far issued five non-resident deer licenses this month at $25 per.

•••

Big results hang sometimes upon slender majorities. One less electoral vote would have defeated Thomas Jefferson for president and put into that office Aaron Burr.

One more vote in the senate would have removed Andrew Jackson as president of the United States.

A deciding vote in the senate cast by Vice President Dallas enacted a tariff law.

One more electoral vote would have sent Samuel J. Tilden to the White House and kept Rutherford B. Hayes in Ohio.

A change of 600 votes in New York state in 1884 would have defeated Grover Cleveland and made James G. Blaine president.

And yet every third man who might vote in Philadelphia on Nov. 7 won’t vote. Politically considered, the silliest thing any man can say to himself is, “My vote won’t make any difference.” – Gerald in the Philadelphia Ledger.

80 YEARS AGO
The Republican-News
and St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, November 19, 1936

Michigan’s big game season got underway early Sunday morning with about the same number of hunters in the upper peninsula as last season. The huge red clad army was cheered by the freezing weather and snow falls that reached good tracking proportions in most of the deer country.

•••

Uncle Sam’s long arm reached into St. Ignace this week when the post office department, in conjunction with the social security board, began the distribution of forms for launching the act to all city employers, Postmaster O. C. Boynton Jr., has announced.

Boynton has estimated that the directors of 84 St. Ignace business establishes have received the first forms, known as the SS-4.

Though the postmaster is charged with distribution of the social security forms, it is not within his jurisdiction to make interpretations of the act. According to Benedict Crowell, director of Ohio, Kentucky and Michigan, the social security board is the sole source of information regarding the old-age benefits provisions of the act, but questions regarding the collection of taxes, who is and who is not subject to tax, should be addressed to the nearest collector of internal revenue.

According to instructions received from postal headquarters in Washington, St. Ignace employers are required to fill out these forms and return them to the local postoffice on or before November 21.

It is estimated at 26,000,000 employees all over the nation will be included in the provisions of the act. Monthly benefits to persons of 65 years of age or over will not begin to be paid until January 1. Benefits will then range from $10 to $85 per month.

•••

Governor Frank D. Fitzgerald Monday appointed Prentiss M. Brown of St. Ignace, former congressman from this district and senator elect from Michigan, to fill the unexpired term of the late Republican Senator James Couzens. Brown is an old line Democrat.

Governor Fitzgerald said in making the appointment that he did so to obtain seniority rights for Brown in the senate committee assignments, and added: “The advantage thus gained will be of distinct benefit to the people of Michigan.”

Without Monday’s appointment, Mr. Brown would have become U.S. senator in January.

•••

Principal H. L. Dettman, his staff of teachers and students in the Third ward public school are “amazed” at the fine showing made by their newly inaugurated “safety patrol.” This patrol is arranged through the co-operation of the American Automobile association and enlists the efforts of students and teachers in preventing highway accidents.

The Third ward school is located on a main highway in the city and the danger to school students has been acute. However with students ardently supporting the new safety regulations, the highway dangers have been minimized.

“We have appointed patrol leaders and student ‘cops’ who have taken their duties seriously,” explained Mr. Dettman. “The automobile association furnishes us with “Sam Brown” belts, shields and medals, which the students are continually striving to acquire. With our patrol leaders getting co-operation from fellow students, the way the safety measures are adopted and followed to the letter is truly amazing. It is our hope that the pupils will be thoroughly trained in highway accident prevention and carefulness will become second nature, thereby lessening the ever present danger of a child being struck by an automobile.”

•••

Winter sports in northern Michigan, future playground of the northwest, are commanding attention during this season as brief hours of wintry winds and dropping temperatures forecast the heavy snows that soon will blanket the north country.

In St. Ignace the National Youths’ administration organization is engaged in preparing material for the enjoyment of the natural ice and snow conditions which are prevalent in this vicinity throughout the long winter months.

Director Nel LaBreche has a crew of young men at work at the city hall fashioning rustic benches and a log lean-to.

The plan is to create an ice rink, utilizing the natural ice on the bay. This rink will be kept cleared by NYA boys and will be furnished with seats and a protection lean-to where skaters may change shoes and store clothing. It is hoped that the rink may be well lighted during winter evenings.

Last year the same organization constructed a toboggan slide on “Darby bluff,” near the Manson cottages. This proved popular and will be maintained again this winter. Lighting may be provided for this section also.

•••

Alfred “Pun” LaDuke, who had been pitching baseball for professional teams in Wisconsin during the last season, arrived home from Oconto, Wisconsin, Monday night.

‘Pun” brought home the news that he was married on Saturday November 14, at Oconto. His wife, the former Miss Florence Griebenow of Green Bay Wis., will join him here shortly after Thanksgiving.

•••

A program for the completion of ten and one-half miles of new road west of Hessel and Les Cheneaux Islands, Mackinac county, has been approved and work is under way.

The new pike will open miles of prospective summer resorting territory on the north shore of Lake Huron. It will extend from a short distance north of Hessel on Highway M- 4 to Search Bay and Ponchartrain Shores, and will eventually have a western junction with M-4 near Pine river bridge.

One of the locations to be served by this scenic highway will be Point Brule, southwest of Hessel, where several handsome summer cottages were constructed this year. Point Brule has one of the finest sand beaches in the upper peninsula and it is becoming increasingly popular with summer bathers and picnickers.

•••

The St. Ignace WPA office which is under the direction of C. P. Becker, announced yesterday that the Gros Cap school project had been approved by WPA authorities. This opens the way for the construction of a $40,000 school building at Gros Cap in Moran township to replace the frame building burned by fire early last spring. Since losing their school building, Gros Cap students have been crowded into the one-room town hall and over flow have attended LaSalle school at St. Ignace.

The new school was designed by G. Harold Thompson, architect in charge of the Mackinac county court house. It will be a modern, fire-proof and adequate building for educational facilities in Moran township. The approval means that there is a possibility of getting the building constructed this winter and next summer in time for the 1937-38 school year.

•••

The railway section crew under the direction of Nestor Hill last week completely removed the rails and ties from the “old furnace” right of way which ran from Truckey street crossing towards the First ward.

This track was one of the first right of ways obtained when the railway was put in here. It served to supply the old Martel furnace located near Graham’s point This iron furnace was operated from 1880 to about 1900 and once employed about 200 men. Several of its original employees, including James Sorenson, James Mc- Graw and Louis Fuser, are still living here.

After the furnace was razed the southerly portion of the track was torn up, but until recently the northerly part of the spur was used for idle freight cars, movable homes of bridge crews and repair men, often for unloading wood and special freight.

•••

The business district of Mackinac Island was threatened by fire Tuesday morning when a portion of the roof of the Bogan building, located in the center of the business section, broke into a blaze.

Fire Chief James Chapman and his volunteers hurried into action and extinguished the fire before a great amount of damage was done. The fire, evidently started by sparks from a nearby chimney and fanned by high winds, had gained considerable headway. Fast work limited the damage and saved the building.

With the permission of Mayor Ed. Horn, Mr. Joseph Wenzel, manager of the Grand Hotel drove his automobile to the home of James Chambers where they picked up Mr. Chambers, who is unable to walk due to an unfortunate accident last summer. Mr. Wenzel will take Mr. Chambers to his sister’s home in Iron Mountain where he will receive further medical attention. The trip to and from the mainland was made on the Arnold steamer Elva.

Clark Ladd, superintendent of the Mackinac island State Park, and his wife left Thursday for their hunting lodge at Bay Mills, Mich.

The U. S. Lightship tender, the Sumac, moored at the Arnold dock Sunday night. She will soon begin operations to clear his navigable district of buoys, lights and other markers before the ice sets in.

•••

On Thursday the Birthday club met at the home of Mrs. Russell Earl. A tasty 1:30 luncheon was served to the guests and bridge was played during the afternoon Honors were given to Mrs. Irving LaChapelle.

•••

Three freighters took shelter in Moran bay during Saturday night’s and Sunday’s storm. They were able to put out last Sunday when the wind had gone down.

50 YEARS AGO
The Republican-News
and St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, November 17, 1966

Sometime during the night of November 9th thieves broke into Nelson’s Standard Service on West US-2 and removed a 250 to 300 pound safe with its contents. Manager of the station, Clyde Nelson, reports that the safe contained all his personal records such as insurance policies and an estimated amount of cash of $1,400 to $1,500. He added that he didn’t have one check in the bundle.

The thieves gained entrance by breaking a side window near the back of the garage and entered the station office by the door between the office and the garage. Because of the size and unwieldy nature of the steel safe, Nelson believes it would have taken at least two men or maybe three to push the safe from underneath the desk in the office into the garage and across the garage floor to the far overhead sliding garage door which can be opened form the inside. The thieves then evidently had to lift the safe into a waiting truck or car.

Nelson states that he does not think the safe thieves took one other thing from the station although several hundred dollars worth of tires and other equipment were in the garage. “This is the third time I’ve been broken into out here, but this is the first time they ever took the safe,” Nelson said.

•••

The Mackinac County planning commission held an unofficial meeting Wednesday at the county courthouse to discuss matters brought up by county planner Iven Alten of Ann Arbor.

Alten presented the master educational plan that is to be incorporated into the final draft of the master plan for Mackinac county.

In the educational plan for the county, Alten strongly recommends that the commission and the county support the consolidation of the U.P. school districts under the direction of the Eastern U. P. School District Study Committee plan.

As projected for the future the plan recommends two goals. The first is that the eastern U.P. school district should build, rather than many comprehensive high schools, large regional resource centers to serve as the base for specialized personnel and facilities. Students and staff may be bussed to these facilities one or two days a week to use the facilities, services and staff.

The second recommendation is that a general program be continued in the local districts. In this way the local districts would continue to develop the control standards on the basis of their ability to support facilities and programs.

•••

Mackinac Bridge officials reported that 31,308 downstate hunter vehicles had crossed over by Friday midnight. This figure was slightly ahead of last year’s of 31,160 for the three-day period before opening day of the 1966 deer hunting season.

•••

The 1966-67 cribbage season will get underway this Friday evening, November 18, at 8 p.m., according to Toivo Hill, secretary-treasurer. The first session of the year will find the following teams competing: Barber Shop vs. Plumbers; Pembles vs. Ryerse Sales; Mackinac Sales vs. Taylors; Legion vs. Marine Bar.

•••

Early deer kills on opening morning were reported by Ernest Giacherio who downed a 7-point, 175 pound buck in the Carp River area at 7:15. Vern Thompson filled his license a short time later, when at8a6-point,125pounddeerfell to his rifle.

Bob LeCount, Jr., 16, got a 100- pound doe at Brevort River Sunday about 4 p.m. Hunting from the same camp, Rick Tilford downed a 180 pound, 8-point buck on opening day.

Linda McLeod, who clerks at Saul’s, shot a 3-point buck of about 125 pounds near Wiggins corner at Carp River on Sunday about 9:15 a.m.

Joe Sayles bagged his deer Sunday near Cut River. His was a 150- pound buck with 10 points.

Tom Simmons of the St. Ignace police department connected for a 12-point buck that weighed 225 pounds, field dressed. Happened Tuesday morning in the Simmons Settlement area.

Gary Alkire of Lansing and Earl Alkire of Port Huron shot a buck and doe, respectively, opening morning while hunting back of Sophie’s.

•••

From Moran: Our congratulations to all those Republicans who won in the election on November 8th. Local persons who won were Arthur Kaminsky, supervisor; Mrs. Kathryn Langstaff, treasurer; Mrs. Reva Schimmelpenny, clerk; August Novenske and Melvin Schimmelpenny, constables; Harry Peta, township trustee.

Our congratulations to Robert Davis, new state representative from this district. He is the husband of Mrs. Marjorie Davis, a member of the Moran school faculty.

•••

From Les Cheneaux: A lesson on Christmas decorations highlighted the meeting of the Hessel Homemakers on Wednesday evening. The lesson was presented by Mrs. Loraine Weston, a skilled craftsman and designer.

Guests of the Carl G. Hessels of Lake St. over Thanksgiving will be Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hessel and four children of Mattawan.

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