2017-02-16 / Columns

All About The Town

By Betty Browning
By Betty Browning

“Truly, ours is a circle of friendship, united by our ideals.”

This is a quote from Juliette Gordon Low in 1912 when she organized the first Girl Scout Troop in her hometown of Savannah, Georgia. She and 18 of her friends began a movement that today has nearly three million active members, and more than 59 million alumnae members. The Girl Scouts are active in 92 countries around the world.

Here in St. Ignace, there is not only a Girl Scout troop, there is also a Cadet Scout troop, and a Junior Scout troop.

The Cadet Scouts and the Junior Scout troops are working diligently to raise money to fund their July trip to the state capital in Lansing.

Scout Leader Toni Hutchins, who has been working with the Girl Scouts for more than 11 years, is currently the Cadet Troop Leader for Troop #5127. Cassandra Rickley, who is the Junior Scout Leader for Troop #5124, has been with the Girl Scouts for more than a year now.


At left: Junior Girl Scouts (front, from left) Nevaeh Houser, Patience Holt, Janessa Breda; (back) Kaitlyn Campbell, Elizabeth Vanier, Lauren Massey, and Junior Troop leader Cassandra Rickley. At left: Junior Girl Scouts (front, from left) Nevaeh Houser, Patience Holt, Janessa Breda; (back) Kaitlyn Campbell, Elizabeth Vanier, Lauren Massey, and Junior Troop leader Cassandra Rickley. Both troop leaders explained the different levels of Scouts, and their colors.

Daisies are the youngest of the Girl Scout Troops, and they wear a blue smock. Then they are moved up to a Brownie, and this troop wears a brown vest or sash. Then girls may become a Junior Scout, wearing either a green sash or green vest. A Cadet Scout wears the beige vest or sash, just as the Girl Scouts do.

Moving up to the different levels also includes earning different badges. Badges can be earned for camping, first aid, art, music, or a project completed. There is even a badge for a Savvy Shopper. During the years a girl spends in the Scouts, she can earn hundreds of badges and awards, and the best part is she will make friends for life, as many of the girls said.


Above: Cadet Girl Scouts Mariah Grondin, Jaylynn Mc- Neely, Cadet Troop Leader- Toni Hutchins, Ali Vanier, Shelby Hutchins, and on video, Carly Bora and her mother, assistant troop leader Erin Pincombe. Missing from photograph is Liberty Cullen. Above: Cadet Girl Scouts Mariah Grondin, Jaylynn Mc- Neely, Cadet Troop Leader- Toni Hutchins, Ali Vanier, Shelby Hutchins, and on video, Carly Bora and her mother, assistant troop leader Erin Pincombe. Missing from photograph is Liberty Cullen. One of the Cadet Scouts, Carly Bora, who has moved away, wants to still be an active member of this troop, so when they have meetings, she joins by video conference. Her mother, Erin Pincombe, who is a troop leader, still helps with the troop, even at a distance. She and Carly will join the girls on the Lansing trip in July.

The girls hope to earn more than $2,000 for their trip, and while in Lansing they are going to be given a private tour of the Potter Park Zoo, even before the zoo opens. They will also visit the Impressions 5 Science Museum, the planetarium, and the state capitol. The girls are also researching other Lansing locations they want to visit if time permits.


At left: Junior Troop Leader Cassandra Rickley (left) who has been working with the Girl Scouts for more than a year, and Cadet Troop Leader Toni Hutchins, who has worked for the Girl Scouts for more than 11 years. At left: Junior Troop Leader Cassandra Rickley (left) who has been working with the Girl Scouts for more than a year, and Cadet Troop Leader Toni Hutchins, who has worked for the Girl Scouts for more than 11 years. Mrs. Hutchins said that they are also hoping to take the girls to Ishpeming in March for a March Madness weekend. There, they will meet with other Upper Peninsula troops. Each girl will pick five sessions to attend while there. Some of the activities the girls can choose from include archery, swimming, painting, digital photography, and jewelry making. They will earn badges and awards for each session they complete.

Before I left the girls to their research, I asked why they wanted to be a Girl Scout. Responses included “I like making new friends, and doing all the different things we do,” and “ I like the sharing and helping others.” think these girls are on the right track. They are not only learning life skills, they are making friends for life.



Girl Scouts can earn badges for projects and activities as they progress through the different levels of Scouts. Seen here is a Girl Scout vest with some of the patches earned. Girl Scouts can earn badges for projects and activities as they progress through the different levels of Scouts. Seen here is a Girl Scout vest with some of the patches earned.

A Girl Scout sash with patches earned. A Girl Scout sash with patches earned.

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