2017-06-22 / Columns

Looking Back

125 YEARS AGO

The St. Ignace News

Saturday, June 25, 1892

The Grand Hotel opens its doors July 1st.

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W. E. McAdams is opening a fine store at the Island.

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The Barge “Lone Star” ran on Grahams Shoal Thursday, but the water raised in the evening and she floated off.

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The prop. City of Charlevoix ran ashore at Mackinaw City Friday morning in a dense fog.

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An excursion to Les Cheneaux Islands will be run on the 4th at very cheap rates. Muskalonge Hotel will be the objective point. Ice cream for sale.

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Conrad Orth and family left for Detroit on the str. City of Alpena Saturday evening last. Mrs. Orth and the children had gone on board, and as the boat was about to leave, and the gang plank had been pulled in, Mr. Orth attempted to board the boat. He slipped and fell striking his head on the gang plank knocking him back in the water, cutting a severe gash in his head.

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The New York stars who are booked for a performance here on June 30 are very highly recommended by the press everywhere. They are a strong company of talented artists and should be liberally patronized by our theatre going people.

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Last Sunday morning the Presbyterian Church was crammed to the doors on the occasion of a sermon preached to the order of Foresters by Rev. John Ferries, who s their C. R. The order turned out in full force and showed the cream of our business men are connected with it. The sermon dealt very fully and forcibly with the duty of every man providing for his dear ones in the event of his death and showed the benefits of the order of Foresters as providing a safe insurance from the low expense connected with it – so cheap as to be within the reach of every laboring man.

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The marriage of Miss Florence R. Cornell of Mr. Harry B. Baker, of Tiffin, Ohio, was solemnized on Wednesday evening, by Rev. John Ferries, at the residence of the bride’s parents. The poor health of the bride’s mother rendered it necessary that the ceremony be private, consequently a few of only the most intimate friends were present. The whole passed off in a most felicitous manner, many a good wish being expressed for the prosperity and happiness of the young couple. In this, the many friends of the bride in this city was heartily concurred in. Mr. and Mrs. Baker left for the South on the 10:30 train.

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From Naubinway: Mr. Jim splinter and Andrew Guthry had a little set to one day last week while working on the logs in the bay. During their performance they both took a bath. They looked rather peaked when they got on solid footing.

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From Portage: The cut worms have destroyed most of the gardens.

George Peck, or Pecks Bad Boy, is putting in a fine crop; he is bound to let the people know what he can do. He forgets to put on his hat when going to work. Jacob Snyder has got in a fine crop and it is plain to be seen that Jake knows how to farm and is not afraid to work.

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Everybody should see the Bohemian glass blowers at store on State street next door to Mulcrone Bros. and witness their wonderful work in making the most beautiful ornaments in glass. Specimen tickets 10c. Every visitor receives a present. Wednesday afternoon a beautiful case will be given to a lady and at night the large glass pipe will be given to a gentleman who holds the lucky numbers.

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From Hessel: Vessels from outside are arriving here almost daily; five vessels and one steam barge left for Chicago the first of the week.

Todd & Bennett have removed their drug store down to Patrick’s for the season.

John Everett, of Chicago, arrived here to-day and will build a fine residence on Marquette Island.

Mr. Whiteside has just returned from Bay City with a fine steam yacht.

The telegraph cable between here and the Island is out of repair and the messages are now sent over by the str. Chas. West.

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Deputy Game Warden Harry Woods caught 80 pounds of brook trout this week at Carp River; some of the trout weighed over two and a half pounds.

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Holt Stringham has resigned his position as clerk on the steamer hunter; he expects to engage in his old business selling steam engines for a New York firm.

100 YEARS AGO

The St. Ignace Enterprise

Thursday, June 21, 1917

Any legitimate movement that in any way tends to increase the business of this community and the prosperity and happiness of our inhabitants should receive the undivided support of our city. In belief that the terminal of the Dixie highway at Sault Ste. Marie instead of Mackinaw City would have a tendency to do all these things, The Enterprise gives the Soo promoters of the scheme its most earnest support.

For a number of years it has been the dream of our community to find ways and means to increase the automobile traffic to and thru St. Ignace. When the first county road bonds were voted, this was one of the big inducements advanced for the raising of the loan for improvements of our highways. Unfortunately the amount that the county could raise under the law was insufficient to carry out all the plans contemplated, one of which was to provide a macadamized road to the Snows as a connecting link with the Chippewa road system. It was then said, and is today, that such a highway would prove most advantageous not only to St. Ignace but to all the territory along the route. This city would be more largely benefitted, inasmuch that in crossing and recrossing the straits, automobiles would necessarily have to stop here for a greater or less period of time, and all would leave a little money at least among our business men.

The road to the Snows is not yet finished, nor is there funds on hand to prosecute the work, but the necessity for the road and the benefits that would accrue therefrom are just as apparent today as ever.

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The Standard Post & Tie Co. has finished the grading for its track extension to the pavilion grounds and it is expected that the steel will be laid so as to allow traffic sometime next week. Manager Albrecht superintended the work and made a great improvement in the city’s old gravel pit, which he caused to be graded and leveled off. Plans for the elevator crossing from the water front to the pavilion are now being prepared and the company will soon have its plant in operation.

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Extending the service to meet the summer traffic on the Great Lakes the Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Co., announces the addition of four more streamers on the regular scheduled routes, says a Detroit dispatch to the Enterprise. On the route between Detroit and Cleveland the steamers Eastern States and Western States will be joined on June 23 by the steamers City of Detroit II and City of St. Ignace. The four boats will furnish day and night service between the two cities every day except Sunday. The day boat will leave Detroit at 8:30 a.m. arriving in Cleveland at 4 p.m. while two night boats will leave the foot of Third street every night at 10:45 a.m. and 11 o’- clock.

The steamer City of Alpena joined the steamer City of Mackinac II Saturday on the Detroit and Mackinac route. The City of Alpena II left here at 5 p.m. for her first trip this season. From now on these two boats will make four trips a week leaving Detroit on Monday and Saturday at 8:30 a.m. The steamer State of New York also went into service Saturday covering the route between Toledo and Put-in-Bay daily.

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“Contrary to the old adage of the hotel business that the waste of food was in the kitchen, I hold that more food is thrown into the garbage can than is consumed by the patrons,” said A. A. Schantz, vice-president and general manager of the Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Co., in discussing the conservation of food by the transportation companies and public eating places. “There is far more food cooked than is eaten and this is due entirely to the extravagance of the American people in ordering more than their appetite demands.

“The saving of food has been a big problem with the transportation lines in America. Thousands of dollars are virtually thrown away every year through unnecessary food expenses. In spite of the thought given this subject little has been accomplished in remedying the situation. The sensitiveness of the traveling public to limitations and restrictions of all kinds has tended to halt any concerted action towards decreasing extravagance in the use of food.

“On the D. & C. boats we are experimenting with what we call a war food conserving breakfast menu and I am pleased to say that our patrons have caught the spirit of the scheme and it is proving a success. In brief the plan provides for cutting the ordinary portions served for breakfast, one half. Of course the price is reduced in proportion materially cutting the cost of eating and at the same time saving the extra food that was usually untouched when the passenger ordered the former full portion.

“Instead of serving ham and eggs, now we serve ham and egg, consisting of one fried egg and a small piece of ham, and the same with bacon and egg. All other egg dishes call for one egg. Chops are served singly when ordered from the war menu. Hash and salad orders are also cut down to smaller portions. We intend eventually to extend the plan to include our luncheon and dinner menus. Our present regular table d’hote dinner of ten courses will be cut to six courses, reducing the price one half.”

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St. Ignace will celebrate the Fourth of July with a big patriotic program and invites the people of the entire county and those surrounding to join in the doings.

The members of the Gateway City band have taken up the matter of the celebration and will have charge of the program of events.

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St. Ignace is to have base ball once more, a game having been arranged to be played on July 4th as part of the big celebration, for a $25 purse offered by the Gateway City band, which has the celebration in charge.

Rufus Dill will have charge of rounding up the home bunch, and has secured the Cedarville team to furnish the other end of the argument, which is a guarantee of a real game.

The game will be played on the circus grounds in the Third ward, which will be put in shape right after the circus is over and the home boys will work out there next Sunday.

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James Boynton, Bert Taylor and Harold Schultz left yesterday morning for Grand Rapids and from there will go to Columbus barracks where they will be assigned to duty in the army. Boynton will enter the hospital service and Taylor and Schultz will join the field artillery. They’re three husky young men, and the physician who examined them complimented them on their showing. St. Ignace is proud of this trio of young patriots.

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Frank Millet, who is working the Joe Quinn property in the city, has put in quite a field of head lettuce. Frank is one of the expert head lettuce gardeners in the county and the Mackinac county product cannot be excelled anywhere.

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Sheriff Benjamin went to the Snows Tuesday where he arrested James Lewis, who failed to register for war service. Lewis claimed that he was on an island registration day and had no boat to reach the mainland. He was allowed to register and go his way.

A number of men from one of the east end camps put in an appearance at the county clerk’s office Tuesday. They said they had been informed the officers were looking for them for failing to register, but all claimed to be over age. The sheriff and clerk will make an investigation as they are positing that some of the men are subject to draft.

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Bonnie Peach before returning to his work at the Canadian Soo Monday morning, was registered with the conscriptionists for war service. Bonnie said that the American consul at the Canadian Soo had informed him that he was not required to register until called upon to do so by the Chippewa county board.

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Chas. Hesse, one of the most popular of the many traveling men to visit this city, is proud of the fact that the concern he represents, the National Biscuit Company, took half a million dollars in Liberty bonds. This should certainly be an inspiration whenever Uneeda biscuit to know that a portion of the profits on your purchase have been put to such a patriotic purpose. Charlie, although a German himself, is glad to, to do his bit towards giving the Kaiser a smash in the eye.

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From Allenville: The work on the new telephone system is progressing fine and we hope to see everything working in the near future. John Kolar with a crew was putting up poles as far as Burton’s corner the first of the week.

The tall young man from Moran would do better if he got a little more experience before attempting to take his best girl for an auto ride. The next time he does so we would advise that he get his machine out of the ditch before daylight if he desires to avoid undue notoriety.

Although the installation of the electric machinery at the Luepnitz building is being done by the same men who wired the Erskine building here with such success, things do not seem to work as well in Moran as at Allenville and there has been considerable trouble in getting things started. One of the reasons given is that the hot air of Moran is so much stronger than the electric juice it don’t have a fair chance to work.

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From Mackinac Island: Wilfred Puttkammer arrived Monday fresh from his newly won laurels at the University of Chicago where he was again a student carrying the highest honors at the seat of learning, just as he did at Princeton four years ago. This time it was in the law department, and though many fine openings with prominent legal men in Chicago were offered to him, Mr. Puttkammer did not accept any of them. He is most desirous of serving his country in some capacity where his familiarity with five languages will be valuable.

80 YEARS AGO
The Republican-News
and St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, June 24, 1937

Thomas F. Grant, post 62, American Legion, in co-operation with a civic committee will assure St. Ignace and Mackinac county of a festive Fourth of July. The Independence day celebration will be featured in St. Ignace on Monday, July 5, official holiday as the Fourth falls on Sunday…

It is confidently predicted that, because of the fine record in July 4th celebrations maintained during the past two years, the event this year will attract even more out-of-town guests than previously.

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The Governor’s tour of Michigan, consisting of 50 metropolitan travel editors and travel bureau executives who are instrumental in routing 10 million tourists into vacation territories arrived in St. Ignace Sunday. They were entertained here at six o’- clock dinner at he Homestead CafĂ©, guests of the city and the Lions Club. They stayed all night here as guests of Mrs. John Goulding’s Forest Grove Lodge and of Birch Lodge, Trout Lake.

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The First National Bank of St. Ignace has opened a seasonal agency at Mackinac Island. The agency opened Monday, June 21, in the bank building and is in charge of Miss Helen Powers of St. Ignace.

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Mrs. Olaf Mechalson of Marinette, summer resident here for the past 17 years, voiced the sentiment of the entire community when talking with The Republican-News Tuesday.

“This is the most beautiful location I have ever seen,” said Mrs. Mechalson. “It is simply too bad that the beach front cannot be improved.”

Mrs. Machalson said that when she first came here 17 years ago the town did not present a pretty picture. She said that there has been a great deal of improvement, pointing to the new roads and the fine piers erected and maintained by the state highway department.

“If there were only some way that St. Ignace might co-operate with the state highway department to fully improve the harbor the investment would be more than warranted,” declared Mrs. Machalson.

Her story of the conditions is similar to that heard time and again by many St. Ignace people. Visitors and summer residents appreciate the freshness of the Great Lakes waters placed at our door and often wonder why we cannot find a way to take full advantage of nature’s gifts.

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From Mackinac Island: Mrs. Lillian Truscott, 80, suffered a dislocated and fractured femur, but Mrs. R. S. Webb and Mrs. Frank Doherty escaped injury when the three were pitched from a carriage while out on a drive Tuesday afternoon

The three were out riding in a carriage when the driver found the trail high in the interior of the island locked by fallen trees. While the carriage was being turned around, a wheel dipped into a hole in the side of the road and the three were thrown to the ground.

A three-masted barque weighing six hundred tons was escorted from the harbor to the town dock by the U. S. coast guards. The ship’s name was the Fontome of England, belonging to Hon. Arthur Guinness. The Fontome made the voyage from England to Montreal in seventeen days and then to Mackinac Island. It left the Island to go to Superior, then to Quebec, through the Welland channel and back to England. On board was a party of friends of the owner.

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Robert Russell, former manager of the state ferry administration office here, has been transferred to the highway department office at Crystal Falls.

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Workmen began excavation Tuesday morning on the lot at the corner of State and Truckey streets for the construction of the new White Star Northern gasoline station.

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Howard Walker of St. Ignace, student at the Annapolis naval academy, is on a three-month tour of Europe on one of the navy’s huge battleships. At present he and his fellow students are in the interior of Germany. They will also visit Italy and Greece.

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The Cloverland Oil Co. of Rudyard, which handles Phillips 66 gasoline, were granted a permit to build a stucco or cement block station on lots two and three. The lots are located near the I. H. Kolbe fish market across from Frank Vallier’s beer parlor.

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As the bank moratorium spread from Michigan in 1933, so the 1937 sit-down labor trouble has grown like a prairie fire.

Phillip Murray, strike leader of C.I.O. now warns of a “federal civil war.”

At a University of Michigan centennial program, Chester H. Rowell, a San Francisco editor, declared that the United States is on the way to a dictatorship.

At Lansing the governor, harried by legislators, maintained his calm assurance that America is merely having temporary “labor pains” as it gives birth to a new magna carta of industrial rights for the worker.

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From Gros Cap: Carl Worth of Brevort expects to start work soon on a new gas station, and he also expects to build overnight cabins as an added attraction. This new business place will be situated on the new Scenic Highway on West Moran Bay.

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From Moran: Work on the remodeling of the Lutheran church is progressing favorably. Many improvements are being made; a basement is being put in, the main part of the church will be extended to include an arch for the altar, a furnace will be installed. The purchase of new pews is also being considered. Meanwhile services are being held in the town hall.

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Mackinac county social workers attended a state-wide conference at Marquette last week. At the high school gymnasium, the various counties had exhibits on view for public inspection. The Republican- News was gratified to learn that of all the exhibits on display, Mackinac’s was, according to the numbers attracted to it, one of the finest, if not the very best.

In the Mackinac exhibit, which was originated and presented by Mrs. L. M. Crawford, were the following attractions:

A group of photos of early Mackinac, including views of lumbering days of 1910 and 10911, scenes of Hessel, St. Ignace and Mackinac Island in the early days. These were donated for the purpose by Mr. Geo. Wickman, photographer.

There was a group of Indian stone relics such as arrowheads and tomahawks, collections recovered from Indian burial mounds in this vicinity.

Mr. Clarence Eby had loaned a splendid exhibit of Mackinac Indian handicraft, including baskets and other commercial souvenirs.

Mr. Otto Lang, manager of the Arnold Transit Co., expressed armloads of lilacs to grace the booth. The mass of flowers were labeled “It’s lilac time at Mackinac Island.”

Col. Roger Andrews of the state park commission sent along a large assortment of Mackinac Island tourist literature which was eagerly examined.

The fine display drew many favorable comments from down-state social workers who appeared especially interested in the Mackinac county displays.

50 YEARS AGO
The Republican-News
and St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, June 22, 1967

Construction of a new $212 million pipeline which will bring natural gas service to the eastern end of the Upper Peninsula in the fall of 1968 was approved by the Federal Poser Commission. The joint American- Canadian pipeline will be 1,000 miles long and 36 inches in diameter. It will be built and operated by the Great Lakes Gas Transmission Company jointly owned by American Natural gas Company and Trans- Canada Pipe Lines Limited of Toronto. American Natural is the parent company of Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, Milwaukee, and Central Indiana Gas Company, Muncie.

In addition to the consuming areas of eastern Canada, the new line will make it possible to bring natural gas service in 1968 to the eastern part of the Upper Peninsula, which is the only major area of the state without a natural gas supply.

When completed in the fall of 1968, the pipeline will stretch from Emerson, Manitoba, through Minnesota and northern Wisconsin, across Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, under the Straits of Mackinac and through lower Michigan to St. Clair and then under the St. Clair River to Sarnia. The entire length, except for river crossings, will be 36 inches in diameter, making it the largest long distance transmission gas line in this part of the country. A 10-inch branch line will run 43 miles from a point west of St. Ignace to the twin cities of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan and Ontario. This line will cross the St. Mary’s River near the Soo locks.

The project will make natural gas available for the first time to some 11,000 potential customers, including Manistique, Newberry, St. Ignace, Rudyard, Soo and surrounding communities.

First crews will go to work on the half-mile crossing of the St. Clair river. Instead of the 36-inch line, two 24-inch concrete coated lines will be dredged into the river bottom. Great Lakes is responsible for the American side of the river and Trans- Canada for the Canadian side.

The most spectacular part of the project will be the 4.5 mile crossing of the scenic Straits of Mackinac in the summer of 1968. Here, too, Great Lakes will install two 24-inch concrete coated lines. The Straits crossing, about four miles west of the world-famous Mackinac Bridge, will cost an estimated $5.2 million.

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Consensus in St. Ignace yesterday appeared to be “let’s leave our clocks alone until this time thing is settled.”

Lansing threw hands up in the air and said the upper peninsula could revert to Central Standard time if it wanted to – and the western half does and is, only on daylight savings.

Mackinac, Luce and Chippewa counties elected to move in the Eastern time zone and are on daylight savings, an hour ahead of the rest of the U.P.

Now Lansing says all the U. P. should be alike. The state police will operate on Central daylight saving time.

However, the Mackinac Bridge, utilities and most business places in St. Ignace are on the Eastern daylight time and propose to remain thus for the time being.

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At a meeting Wednesday night of the St. Ignace volunteer fire department, committees in charge of staging the Independence Day celebration here reported that plans are pretty well finished and a Grand Old Fourth should be enjoyed by everyone.

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Miss Leah Gamble and Mr. Mark Milford were united in marriage on Thursday, June 15, at 11 o’clock.

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Goudreau attended the couple.

The bride is employed by Mackinac Sales, Inc. and the bridegroom is the owner and operator of the St. Ignace Garbage Disposal Service.

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John F. Lahaie, director of the Tax Equalization department for Mackinac county, will resign effective July 15 to accept a positon as business manager of the Catholic Diocese of Marquette.

He married Edra LaChapelle of St. Ignace on Jan. 20, 1942. They are the parents of nine children.

Mr. Lahaie, after the ferries suspended, conducted an insurance agency, operated the Glass Kitchen and cooked at the high school cafeteria. He established the Tax Equalization department here a year ago.

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When you enter the front door of the Dolphus LaLonde home you see a small placard hung between the windows which says very well what they have graciously shared together for sixty years of wedded life. The placard reads, “Bless Our Home” and their home has been blessed over the years with ten children, eight of whom are living, 35 grandchildren and 28 great grandchildren who will help them celebrate their Diamond Jubilee on Saturday afternoon at the Legion Hut.

The LaLondes met in Bay City where Mrs. LaLonde boarded with her future husband’s sister. They were married there on June 25, 1907, and began their life together by farming and running a store. In 1911 Mr. LaLonde decided to come to St. Ignace to take up commercial fishing because a cousin of his was already here and prospering in the fishing business. They recall that the life of a fisherman was hard, but rewarding and Mr. LaLonde has been retired now for about 17 years. He still is active for all his 92 years and neighbors are likely to see him working in the yard which he enjoys keeping neat.

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From Les Cheneaux: Les Cheneaux Yacht club will finalize plans for the sailing season this week with tentative plans for the annual Yacht Club Regatta to be run the first week in August, according to F. Harold Taylor of Pickford and Les Cheneaux, chairman of the race committee.

Fire Chief Lyle Hudson reports that the annual July 3rd Fireman’s Ball under the auspices of the Clark Twp. Volunteer Fire Dept., will be held again this year. The mid-summer social affair invariably attracts some 200 guests. It is the major fundraiser for the department with proceeds earmarked for the maintenance of the resuscitator.

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Mackinac college on Mackinac Island has been awarded a $556,916 Office of Education grant for construction of a new physical education building, reports Senator Robert P. Griffin.

Construction of the new facility will get under way in about two months and is expected to be completed in one year.

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Distribution of new telephone directories began Tuesday, June 20, in the St. Ignace area, Michigan Bell Telephone company reports.

James J. Schneider, area manager, said some 3,700 directories will be delivered in St. Ignace, Mackinac island, Brevort and Engadine exchanges.

•••

The City of St. Ignace has earned an Award of Honor for outstanding safety performance at the St. Ignace waste treatment plant during 1964 through 1966.

The award was presented to plan Supt. Peter Simmons by the Michigan Water Pollution Control Association.

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From Mackinac Island: Mackinac Island ushered in its 25th annual Lilac Festival on Saturday, June 17th, with the coronation of Lilac Queen Lorie Cowell, her court: Gail Welcher, and Bonnie Bodwin, and 1966 Lilac Queen Mellie Alford. Queen Lorie was crowned by Gov. George Romney. The Community House was the scene of the coronation and the dance.

Miss Margaret Mary Doud, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert V. Doud of Mackinac island, received her Bachelor of Science degree in education from Central Michigan university at the 75th Commencement exercises held on June 10, 1967.

•••

Walter H. North, comptroller of the Mackinac Bridge Authority, was appointed state treasurer of the Michigan Jaycees by Pat Duggan, president of the Michigan Junior Chamber of Commerce.

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