2017-07-20 / Columns

Looking Back

120 YEARS AGO

The St. Ignace News

Saturday, July 23, 1892

The Democrats of Mackinac County will assemble in convention at the City Hall in the city of St. Ignace on the 11th day of August, 1892, for the purpose of electing the delegates to the State Convention that is to be held in the city of Grand Rapids August 17th, 1892. And if the Convention so decides to elect delegates to the Congressional, Senatorial and Legislative Convention, that are yet to be called, and to transact such other business as may properly come before the Convention.

•••

The Skerback family circus gave four pleasing entertainments here Monday and Tuesday last.

•••

Will LaFountain is nursing a very sore finger, which he jammed while handling ice recently.

•••

The excursion advertised for last Sunday, to the Beavers, was declared off, on account of a poor turn out.

•••

Mr. Harrington, of Epoufette, is looking for the owner of a roan colored horse, which he has been taking care of for several weeks.

•••

The Marley lands on the bluff, recently platted, are now open for inspection of the public. Several streets have been cut through and other improvements made.

•••

For Sale: Large and small engines, two large and one small boiler, large or small wheels of all kinds, shaftings, gearing, etc. These articles were in the burned stave works and consequently will be sold very cheap. Apply to L. Winkelman.

•••

The R. R. people this week cut away the bank of earth of either side of the crossing on Goudreau alley, and will soon put down a plank walk, to connect with the one made by the city.

•••

Assistant Secretary of War Grant and Capt. Miller, of the quarter master’s department, arrived at the Island last Sunday. Capt. Miller is inspecting post quarters and Secretary Grant is to determine the feasibility o putting in water works to supply Fort Mackinac and the cottages on the government reservation. The estimated cost is $30,000.

•••

Louis Paquin was in town this week and ordered a Leffel water wheel for his grist, shingle and saw-mill at Epoufette.

•••

The scows St. Ignace and Mackinac, which left here loaded with cedar Friday, bound for Monroe, lost their deck loads in Saginaw Bay during the recent heavy gale.

•••

Wanted – At the Les Cheneaux Club House, immediately, three girls. One for laundry, one for dish-room, one in kitchen.

E. W. Farmer, Manager

•••

“Grandpa” Connors has been officially notified that his pension has been increased from $2 to $12 per month, dating from July, 1890, thus giving him back-pension amounting to $288. We congratulate “Grandpa” on his success – he deserves it.

•••

John R. O’Neil, the tailor, writes from Detroit that he will not visit St. Ignace again until September. He says himself and wife have got tired of boarding out and are now keeping house at 324 Grand River avenue. He leaves Detroit to-day for Quebec, to visit his mother and other relatives for a short time.

•••

Oliver Massey, of Brevoort Lake, had the misfortune to lose one of the fingers on his right hand last Monday. He accidently fell upon the sharp blade of a scythe, nearly severing the four fingers from his hand. Dr. Young dressed his wounds and saved three of the fingers, the fourth being so terribly lacerated amputation was necessary.

•••

The industrial school was opened in the third ward school house last Saturday by Mrs. Stearns and Miss Spear, who were aided by several young ladies of the city. The beginning was encouraging, there being 35 girls present. We doubt not many more will today take advantage of the very kind and gratuitous work of these ladies. The hour is Saturday at 2 p.m.

•••

Mr. Burns, who is visiting L. Pauly, spent Monday and Tuesday fishing at Brevoort Lake, and was accompanied by Mrs. Pauly’s sister. On Monday, the party caught three black bass and 13 pickerel. On Tuesday they had better luck, having landed 10 black bass, 18 pickerel and one muskellunge. The pickerel ranged in weight from three to eight pounds each, the bass from 3.5 to 5.25 pounds each and the muskellunge weighed even 37 pounds. They were highly pleased with their success and also the fine treatment they received at the hands of landlord

Ryerse, of the Lake View House, whose guests they were at the lake.

•••

A great many strangers in the city this week.

•••

F. S. Hanson’s coachman, named Sampson, was drowned near Mission Point on Thursday, while in bathing.

•••

O. C. Boynton, of Port Huron, is in the city, visiting his parents. While here Oliver will take in all the favorite fishing grounds and commence sending small shipments down to his friends in Port Huron next week.

•••

Up to last Saturday, J. B. Brooks considered himself a pretty good wrestler, but after a one-minute set-to with a bicycle in front of the Sherwood house on that day, all the conceit was twisted out of him. It took two men several minutes to separate John from the wheel.

•••

J. E. Bouchard, the painter, has the contract and work commenced on the Mackinaw Lumber Co.’s barn at Carp River. The job is a big one, 2,144 yards of surface having to be gone over twice. It will keep two men busy for six weeks and three barrels of oil will be used.

•••

From Naubinway: Steam barge Mills ran on the 10 foot shoal south of here in Friday’s blow and broke up badly. Wrecking tug Favorite and steam barge Thos. Scott are slowly towing her in. The Mills is drawing 22 feet – lumber laden.

100 YEARS AGO
The St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, July 19, 1917

Chas. F. Murray has taken over the Chambers dock property and all of the business connected therewith and as lessee will assume personal management. The business carries with it the local agency of the Standard Oil Co., the hard and soft coal privileges, flour, feed, hay, etc.

The Chambers dock is the oldest at this port, having been constructed 47 years ago. It was a small affair at first, being used almost exclusively to accommodate the fishing industry then being carried on extensively by this pioneer firm. Hon. M. Chambers, who has been connected with the firm ever since its inception and is now the only surviving member, hauled all of the timber used in the construction of the original dock and has personally overseen its extensions.

The new manager, through his long connection with the firm of Murray Bros., is thoroughly familiar with every phase of the dock, coal and other business in connection therewith. He is young and aggressive and will endeavor to not only retain the present patronage but increase the business, in which venture he has the best wishes of The Enterprise and of his many friends in the county for success.

•••

The quota to be drafted for the National Army is two-thirds of one per cent of an estimated population by the war department. Michigan is to furnish 30,290 besides 13,645 volunteers. Mackinac county has an estimated population of 8,423 and will therefore be required to furnish 56 men for the National Army. From this is to be taken the number who have enlisted and add the number of men short on the National Guard. The total number will be between 60 and 70 to be drafted. No distinction will be made between the cities and townships. Therefore if any one precinct has already enlisted a sufficient number of men to fill her quota if a distinction were to be made this fact would not exempt any man from that precinct who is called by the draft.

•••

The Gateway City band has leased the hall in the Mulcrone block formerly occupied by the Knights of Pythias. They are fitting it up for an amusement hall and are planning a series of weekly dancing parties for the summer, the first of which is to be given next Tuesday night, July 24.

•••

That Cloverland possesses wonderful possibilities as a sheep growing district is the enthusiastic belief of D. C. Davis, attached to the bureau of animal industry of the United States department of agriculture who is now making a tour through the district with W. F. Raven, head of the department of animal husbandry for the Michigan Agricultural college. Mr. Davis inspected sheep at the farms in Delta and other counties.

“This district is truly a paradise for sheep men if they but knew it,” said Mr. Davis last night. “I had no idea there was a section of the country in the northwest so favorable for sheep raising as this and to say that I am most favorably impressed is putting it mildly.”

•••

That St. Ignace will be on the line of the great Dixie Highway connecting the upper peninsula with the great project that starts in Florida and has connecting links with the Lincoln and other equally important high- ways crisscrossing the country in all directions is fully assured. This is the most important news to reach St. Ignace in many years, as it means eventually that the city is to be revived and is destined in the very near future to become a more important center than ever and will be called upon to entertain tourists from every section of the United States. The highway is of such importance to this city that it is estimated that our present accommodations for both travelers and cars must be more than quadrupled once the highway is completed and the stream of pleasure seekers head north in the heated season each year. The Enterprise does not believe it is painting the picture in too vivid colors when it predicts that the completion of the Dixie Highway to the Soo will make St. Ignace one of the greatest and most populous summer resorts on the chain of the great lakes.

•••

The Standard Post & Tie of Toledo, operating at Moran and St. Ignace, who recently purchased the pavilion property, are rapidly rounding things in shape for extensive operations at this point. The elevator from the bay in which to carry products brought in by water over State street to the banking grounds in the rear of the pavilion is being pushed and will be completed in the near future. The same engine used in the operation of the elevator will also operate an endless chain conveyor connecting different parts of the yard. By this arrangement a large amount of labor will be saved and it will not be necessary for a continual shifting of cars. The company is adding to its stock pile as fast as cars can be secured. It is back on its shipments owing to car shortage.

It is expected that the mill will be removed from Moran during the fall and winter, and it is rumored that there will be a factory in addition to the S. P. & T. Co. occupying a portion of the pavilion.

•••

A double drowning occurred in Frenchman’s lake, near the village of Trout Lake last week Wednesday, the victims being Clifford and Thomas Smith, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smith of Trout Lake and brothers of Mrs. Herbert J. Hotchkiss of this city.

No one witnessed the accident. The boys had gone fishing in a row boat and the last saw of them alive was about 3 o’clock in the afternoon when the elder boy was rowing towards the landing with his young brother perched on the bow of the boat. It is surmised that the little fellow fell overboard and that in attempting his rescue by Clifford both were drowned. The oars were found near where the bodies were discovered. They had been taken out of their locks with the evident intention of assisting in the rescue of the young lad…

Both boys were great favorites in Trout Lake. Clifford was 18 years old last May, and it will be remembered that he was just getting strong and healthy again after a serious illness of many weeks in 1916. Little Tommy was 7 years old and one of the brightest and best liked boys in the village. They were both members of the M. E. Sunday school class and are praised by the pastor of the church and their teacher.

•••

The tallest lightweight in the country, Jimmy Brady, of St. Ignace, Mich., has been matched with Travis Davis, of Seattle, to fight 10 rounds as a preliminary to the Billy Weeks- Kid Gillman 15-round bout at Cincinnati Monday night. Brady stands five feet ten and a half inches and has a reach of seventy-two inches. He has been boxing seven years and has a good record. Among his bouts are a fifteen-round draw with Johnny Tillman and an eightround draw with Ever Hammer. – Cleveland Plain Dealer.

•••

The steamer Islander has been engaged for an excursion to Cedarville Sunday where Dill’s Tigers will clash with Hossack’s Wildcats on the diamond. The boat will leave the Merchandise dock at 9 a.m. and the excursionists will be accompanied by the Gateway City band.

The two teams played here on the 4th and put up one of the best games ever witnessed on a Mackinac county ball ground. The Tigers won by a close score, and Bill Hossack informed The Enterprise this week that he was waiting for sweet revenge when the teams get together again. The Tigers will go prepared for another victory on their old time rivals and will endeavor to bring home a few more scalps. A large crowd from St. Ignace and the surrounding towns are expected to accompany the team and the entire Snows population will be present to witness the contest.

•••

I. B. Easton of St. Helene Island was a business visitor in town yesterday. Mr. Easton has resided on the Island for 21 years, living alone and undisturbed by domestic broils, and as he says, enjoying life.

•••

Ethan Allen, a direct descendant of the original Ethan Allen of Fort Ticonderoga fame, was accepted for enlistment in the United States Marine Corps in Butte, Mont., the other day. He has been principal of a school in this state for the last three years, and has also taught in Ohio and North Dakota. Allen’s enlistment recalls the early days of American history when Fort Ticonderoga was held in turn by the French and British until finally captured by his illustrious grandsire in 1775. It is another reminder of the wiping out of old differences between nations, happily now serving together against a common enemy.

•••

From Brevort: Gideon says the tooth the dentist pulled for him last week was a whopper. He says also that he sent it away to have it mounted on an umbrella handle.

•••

From Moran: If current rumors are to be credited, there are something like nineteen contestants for the honor of postmaster at Moran.

While passing over the road running south from Yott’s corner last Thursday, Philip Lipnitz came suddenly onto a monstrous lynx. The animal was very much frightened by the approach of Phil’s little Lizzie and betook himself to the woods with all possible expedition. The car was instantly stopped and Philip wanted to pursue the creature with a jackknife, that bing the only armament on board, but his lady friend insisted that the privilege of sacking the quadruped should be granted to herself. Philip argued that the spooks would get her but she responded sternly that spooks held no terror for her. Presently the mosquitoes gathered in such formidable numbers that the debate had to be suspended and they proceeded on their original errand, for which the lynx felt very grateful.

•••

From Curtis: Some of the boys fishing last Sunday assert that they saw an aeroplane. Wonder if it’s true.

Alex. Macklin of Germfask was scouting around this section the first of the week seeking bark peelers. He says labor is scarce.

There are about 15 reported guests at present at the Hotel Albion and more have made reservations and are coming later.

••• S. Dennis Sayers, motorcycle officer of the Soo’s police department, lost his left leg in an automobile accident last week. Sayers was on his cycle at the time of the accident which collided with an auto. The unfortunate man was one of the best known officers in this section of the peninsula. He served as deputy sheriff under Sheriffs Bayliss and Bone and in the discharge of his duty made frequent visits to this city where he has many friends who extend their sympathy.

•••

Sheriff Benjamin received word yesterday morning that robbers had raided the postoffice at Ozark the evening before and had made away with a considerable amount of money and other plunder. Inspector McDougall of the Soo is at Ozark in an attempt to get a clue to the thieves.

•••

Every car in the city was utilized Sunday and the garages and liveries did a big business. The city was nearly deserted, all who could taking to the woods and the beautiful lake drives and resorts in this section, Brevort Lake getting a good share. It was an ideal day for motoring.

•••

Volunteer censorship regulations under which the newspapers have refrained from reporting troops movements have been partially suspended by the war department and all the public information committee so as to permit the papers to print almost unrestricted news of the mobilization of the national guard for war service.

•••

From The Snows: H. P. Hossack & Co. are planning a new scow as the larger of their present ones is about used up. It will be about 14 by 32 feet. R. P. White and his men will do the work.

Henry Visnaw has commenced the erection of a new house on his lot adjoining the school house yard on the west. The house will be 24 by 32, two stories. Robert Ruthledge and his sons are doing the work.

We have learned that the Snows hotel will not be opened this season. Fred W. Myers, the owner had expected to be here as usual. He has been sick since last season but was supposed to be getting better, enabling him to attend to business this summer. Recently, however, his illness has taken a turn for the worse and consequently the house will not be open.

Arrangements were made some time ago for a minister to occupy the pulpit of Union Church this summer but on account of sickness the man who was to come was unable to do so and different arrangements will have to be made. Last Sunday evening services were held in the church by Rev. Maltas.

•••

E. H. Hotchkiss, Supervisor M. McGrath and George Litchard drove out to the section of the Snows road on which Engineer Brotherton and crew are at work, a distance of 21 miles, Monday afternoon. The trip to and return, 42 miles, was made in two hours and ten minutes, which would go to prove that this section of the road is in most excellent condition.

80 YEARS AGO
The Republican-News
and St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, July 22, 1937

A. R. Highstone, who holds the distinction of being the first Scoutmaster in the upper peninsula by virtue of organizing and leading a St. Ignace troop 28 years ago, has been named Mackinac county organizer in the Scout movement which is being undertaken in the eastern upper peninsula.

It is planned to bring the full benefits of the highly successful and respected organization known as the Boy Scouts of America to all boys of Mackinac county. This county will be functioning in the Chippewa area which includes Luce county as well.

Mr. Highstone plans for several troops in St. Ignace. He suggests that churches, clubs and other civic groups sponsor troops.

•••

A crack twenty-piece band, gathered from schools in the upper peninsula, that has been giving nightly concerts at Mackinac Island, will appear in St. Ignace next Sunday afternoon for an hour’s concert in Marquette Park.

Twenty high school band boys representing public schools at Sault Ste. Marie, Escanaba, Gladstone, Iron Mountain, Iron River and Menominee have been assembled at Mackinac island and since July 2 have been giving a band concert every evening.

It most likely will be the only chance local folks will have to hear this fine organization, as the boys will return to their home August 3.

•••

Adam McGregor, distributor of Shell oil and gasoline in Mackinac, Chippewa and Luce counties, and Seth McGregor, manager of the Mackinac Motorbus Co. and Mackinac Trucking line, have purchased the garage formerly occupied by the St. Ignace Motor Co. on State street from Mrs. Richard Jones.

Workmen began this week tearing down the gasoline canopy and preparing the building for the new owners’ use as a freight office, bus and truck terminal. The McGregor lines operate between St. Ignace and Sault Ste. Marie and way points.

This real estate deal is to be a beginning in the elimination of “Gasoline Alley” on State street and a big start towards landscaping the waterfront north of the state ferry dock.

Mr. A. R Highstone, who handled the business deal for Mrs. Jones, states that Mr. McGregor is prepared to move his gasoline pumps from the city line on State street if other concerns in the vicinity do likewise.

Without a doubt a large portion of privately owned property north of the ferry dock will present a handsome appearance as the result of the Mc- Gregors acquiring more extended holdings in the area. It is entirely probable that the concern will park the entire premises as rapidly as consistent with the amount of co-operation given by other land owners.

This type of progressiveness is what St. Ignace needs in particular at this time. If there is a united drive to improve the beach front property north of the ferry docks in keeping with the program carried out by the McGregors, St. Ignace will soon realize a long-felt desire, an attractive, roomy and convenient main street through the business section.

•••

A transient Indian sculptor, Riley Bressette of Bayfield, Wis., has established a studio in one of the wigwams at Indian Village. He uses clay and only an old knife for a modeling tool. Bressette is known as a fast worker, taking only about two days to complete a job. Biblical characters are his favorite studies, and he has made several of Father Marquette. It is said that his representations are accurate in detail.

•••

Direct radio phone communication between the ground floor and office and the basement workshop has been installed at Ray Motor Sales. Mr. R. J. McLachlan, owner, recently put in operation a Philcophone unit which permits immediate vocal contact between the men working on the two separate floors. Mr. McLachlan says that the radio communication, which is in operation all day during business hours, provides a means of speeding up service to customers as well as maintaining greater efficiency of operation between the office with its parts department and the mechanics’ shop.

•••

The National Re-employment Service found 384 jobs for residents of Mackinac county during the first six months of this year, Major Howard Starret, State Re-employment Director, reported today.

Private industry called 279 and relief work took 105.

•••

Funeral services for Mrs. Agnes Hotchkiss, 85, wife of the late Edgar Hugh Hotchkiss, were held Sunday afternoon from the family home…

Mr. Hotchkiss was a prominent local citizen in St. Ignace, continuing in active service until 1931. He was cashier of the First National Bank here for years. His early days in St. Ignace were spent as bookkeeper for the Mackinaw Lumber Co….

With her husband achieving civic prominence, Mrs. Hotchkiss maintained the family’s social relations. She was an active and energetic church worker, a member of the Presbyterian church.

•••

It is said that federal investigation will be held in the minute-and-a-half sinking Monday afternoon of the supply boat Frontier, operated by the Pittsburgh Supply Co. at the Soo. Two men drowned, a fireman and a blacksmith. Nine members of the crew and three women were rescued. The Frontier had been damaged and repairs were being made while the boat was in operation.

•••

Sonata, owned by R. R. Williams of Detroit, led a fleet of 23 yachts across the finish line at 5:11 Monday afternoon to win the annual Port Huron to Mackinac island yacht race in the elapsed time of 50 hours, 41 minutes, four seconds. Her corrected time was 46:24:32. Josephine II was second and Alsumar third.

•••

George Davis has purchased the Hammond Standish building and dwelling next door from Mr. James McGraw. Mr. and Mrs. Davis and son will occupy a top floor apartment in the Hammond Standish building and will rent the small house and other apartments in the big building. They plan to move from the Glashaw house they now occupy sometime during this month.

•••

In nearly every city and town in Michigan you will find an automobile house-trailer or two, parked on a vacant lot, emergency domicile of industrial workers.

It is significant then that the first prefabricated trailer-house in America, built strictly for residential use, should be made in Michigan. The “Covered Wagon” firm at Mt. Clemens announces that a unit, containing three rooms and a bath, will be put on the market next fall to sell at a retail price of $600 to $750 – undoubtedly on installment payments, too.

In the making of prefabricated trailer-houses, mass production methods will be applied with the resultant lowering of cost for the public. Michigan with its world-famous skill of the manufacturing assembly line may be the center of another new industry. The Mt. Clemens experiment will be watched with interest everywhere.

•••

From Cedarville: The Bennett cottage at Bush Bay has been purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Aldren Taylor of Pickford.

Oscar Martin of Prentiss Bay has a pike in captivity which is believed to be the largest that has been caught here in the past few years. Mr. Martin invites the public to come and view the fish.

The Galion Club on LaSalle Island is now open for the season.

Persons in this vicinity who are renting summer cabins report that they are having no difficulty in keeping their cabins filled because of the unusually large number of tourists wo have come north.

The Les Cheneaux Islands now have an Information Bureau which is located in the Cedarville Town Hall and operated under the N. Y. A.

Mr. T. H. Pickford of Washington, D. C., was a guest of The Cedar Inn recently. Mr. Pickford was well known around here about fifty years ago when he was a resident of the town of Pickford and owned much of the land of that village as well as in Cedarville. During the years since leaving here, Mr. Pickford has been exceedingly successful financially and for the past twenty years he has been one of the leading citizens of Washington, D. C. He is owner of one of the large hotels near the White House and among his many close friends there are the Cordell Hull family. Included among his intimate associates in Pickford years ago where the late Mr. David Beacon, Mr. Frank Taylor and others. Mr. Pickford’s wife passed away two years ago.

It has been announced by Rep. John Luecke that Howard F. Beach was recently designated as the highest eligible for appointment to the postmastership at Cedarville… Cedarville is listed as a third class office by the Post Office Department. Mr. Beach has been serving as acting postmaster at Cedarville.

•••

Workmen have been leveling off the old Cadillac field across from the Merchandise dock this week. The place has been leased by Adam Mc- Gregor, who may erect a filling station there in the future.

•••

From Mackinac Island: Old Mission church at Mackinac Island, established by the Presbyterian foreign mission organization in 1829-30 under Rev. William M. Ferry, will open its doors next Sunday afternoon at 3:00 p.m. for the 42nd annual community service.

The Rev. H. B. Johnson of Oxford, Michigan, will preach the sermon. It will be the eighth year that Rev. Johnson has led the community service.

During the service music will be rendered from the century-old Melodian owned by the Misses Donnelly of Mackinac Island, a treasure piece.

50 YEARS AGO
The Republican-News
and St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, July 20, 1967

Two young Mackinac county men will leave here July 25 for Detroit for induction into military service. They are Terrence McGrath and Larry Bawks.

•••

State police report a deluge of various activity during the past week including a 5 a.m. report Thursday from the U. S. Coast Guard that an overdue or missing boat between Mackinac and Bois Blanc islands was an object of search. The boat was an 18 ft. outboard with 100 HP motor occupied by Bud Chambers, Jack Welcher and Tom McConnell, all from Mackinac island. The search was ended when the boat was found n Round island where the men had taken refuge on account of high winds and rough water.

•••

From Les Cheneaux: Some 78 staff members, three work crews and families are currently carrying on an extensive work program at Pioneer Girl’s training center, North Star on Prentiss Bay.

A three-day a week program for students in beginning, junior and senior bands is now underway, instructed by John Milburn, Les Cheneaux schools band director.

SP/5 James Fenlon Riccardo and wife Carolyn of Alexandria, Va., spent some time here last week en route through the New England states and Canada. SP/5 Riccardo, a graduate of the U. M. School of Music, is stationed at the army base, Fort Myers, Va., and is First Violinist with the 200-piece U. S. Army Band. He is the son of the former Eileen Fenlon and Nicholas Riccardo, former music director in local schools.

•••

From Mackinac Island: Record fleet to sail from Port Huron, Gratiot Beach above Blue Water bridge at 12:30 p.m. Saturday, July 22. A $5 million price tag has been placed on the sail fleet in Bay View Yacht club’s 43rd Annual Port Huron- Mackinac race, a 235-mile chase of Lake Huron; 216 entries, 37 more boats than last year’s record 173 starters. Four yachts bigger than 50 feet last year, there are 12 boats 50 feet or longer in this year’s race. Starting Saturday, July 15th, Chicago to Mackinac races. Mackinac has taken a festive spirit at this time, the Waterways commission yacht pier is filled to capacity, as well as hotels and rooming houses.

•••

The rail strike tied up 95 per cent of the railway system in the U. S. last week and affected the rail service locally. The Chief Wawatam was off on Tuesday, but resumed carrying railway cars on Wednesday.

•••

Construction is started on a new bridge to carry Taylor Rd. over Taylor creek west of Pickford. Contractor on the $60,788 project is the Karl L. Arntzen Co. of Escanaba. Construction is directed by the Mackinac County Road commission with technical assistance by the state highway department. Cost is financed equally with county and federal funds and the job is to be completed in December.

•••

Herbert E. “Tex” Hamel of St. Ignace is a participant in the Albion summer college where honors biology students are studying the fungus, Neurospora, in a research being done to find ways of controlling undesirable traits or physical defects in man.

•••

With a $10 million to $30 million investment, the alewives that have taken over Lake Michigan and sullied its beaches can be turned into a resource of great wealth, a Michigan fisheries expert said Monday.

Billions of the herring-like fish have died this summer after spawning, littering beaches, clogging water intake systems and harbors, and, in some cases, throwing utility plants out of kilter.

Wayne C. Tody, chief of the Conservation Department’s fisheries division, said the environmental balance in the Great Lakes can be restored by stocking the waters with large number of trout and coho salmon, natural predators of alewife.

•••

The Vacationland, once “queen” of the state carferry fleet at the Straits of Mackinac, has been sold again, the State Highway commission reports.

The 360-foot ship ended its service between Mackinaw City and St. Ignace when the Mackinac Bridge was opened 10 years ago.

In 1961, it was sold for $1.2 million to Compagnie de Navigation Nord-Sud, Ltd, of Rimouski, Quebec. Since then, it has operated across the St. Lawrence River between Rimouski and Baie-Comeau, a 50-mile strip.

Capt. Frank Nelson, who commanded the Vacationland when it was part of the highway department’s ferry fleet, said he has been notified the big ice breaker has been sold to British Columbia Ferry association and is now en route to Canada’s west coast.

The Vacationland was renamed the “Pere Nouvel” when it was sold to the Quebec firm. It will be renamed the “Western Queen” when it goes into service in British Columbia.

•••

A 5-year Michigan fish record was broken recently when a cisco (lake herring) measuring 27.7 inches and weighing 6 pounds, 3 ounces, was taken in a net of the Frazier Fisheries of Naubinway.

•••

Vien Le, French and world geography teacher of LaSalle high school in St. Ignace for the past 4 years, has resigned from his positon. He will be employed at Northern Michigan university in the foreign language department.

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