2017-11-16 / Columns

Looking Back

125 YEARS AGO

The St. Ignace News

Saturday, November 19, 1892

Next Thursday is Thanksgiving and five weeks from to-morrow is Christmas.

•••

The str. Mary has made her last trip and is laid up for the winter.

•••

The str. Mackinac was here Thursday and the Alpena will be here today on their last trip to this port.

•••

Conrad Orth received the sad news Wednesday of his mother’s death at Detroit. He left for that city the same evening.

•••

“Jim Corbett,” the sea lion which escaped from Lincoln Park, Chicago a few weeks ago, was seen off Milwaukee the other day. In his travels he is liable to visit Lake Huron and a call at St. Ignace can be expected.

•••

We print the following from the Detroit Evening News, of the 15th: “A prominent St. Ignace republican shouldered an axe Saturday and proceeded to behead his best rooster. The unfortunate fowl had crowed vigorously the morning after Cleveland’s election.”

•••

The big Democratic ratification meeting and barbecue held last Wednesday at Orth’s Opera House in this city was an immense success. An ox and a pig were roasted and everybody was invited to the feast. It was the largest meeting ever held in the city. The ladies turned out in large numbers. The night was a fine one and the “small boys” was in it all over. The greatest enthusiasm prevailed. Speeches were made by Wm. P. Preston, chairman of the Democratic County Committee, J. J. Thompson, Judge of Probate and Jas. J. Brown, prosecuting attorney elect. The addresses were all fine and the spread gotten up by the Conrad Brothers and Eby was excellent. At the close of the meeting and after everybody had partaken of the lunch the hall was cleared and the younger portion of the crowd joined in the dance which was kept up until early morning. A number of prominent Republicans were present and they were made hearty welcome by the speakers and the audience. Our friend Sherwood was given three cheers and a tiger when he entered the hall with his button hole bouquet and smiling countenance. Mayor Farrell presided at the meeting and introduced the speakers. Capt. Boynton and John Mulcrone occupied seats on the stage with the Mayor and speakers. The hall was decorated with the big Democratic banner belonging to the County Committee and the stage was adorned with the stars and stripes hung up in an artistic manner. Everybody was happy and even the Republicans participated and seemed to enjoy the jollification. It was a night long to be remembered. Nothing like it ever occurred here before. Everything went off smoothly and there were not the slightest thing to mar or interfere with the proceedings and general hurrah and jollification.

•••

F. D. Clark, superintendent of the deaf mute institution of Arkansas, was appointed superintendent of the Michigan institute for the deaf and dumb by the Central Board of Control, last week, to succeed Thomas Monroe, deceased. The new superintendent is one of the leading mute educators in the county.

•••

It is not generally known that placing certain herbs in a room will banish flies from it. Sweet clover, for instance, which is not difficult to obtain, as it is found thriving luxuriously on almost every country roadside, will put flies to rout. The sweet, pungent odor it exhales is quite unobjectionable, but is still abhorred by flies.

•••

A stage line will be put on between St. Ignace and Les Cheneaux as soon as the boat stops running.

•••

The sorrowing republicans are slowly paying their election bets. On Tuesday that old-time bet of wheeling the winner in a wheel-barrow was paid by Axle Stone. Alex Fair was the lucky man who held the onewheel “vehicle” down. S. A. Snyder generaled the procession, the line of march being from the Snyder House to Thomas Dolan’s saloon and return.

•••

At a meeting of Methodists ministers at Detroit, this week, a sharp attack was made on the form of conducting modern funerals. The divines were of the opinion that the funerals of to-day were nothing more than advertisements for the undertakers, the ministers acting as solicitors. They denounce the extravagant funeral displays and believe it is unnecessary expense.

•••

The West is far ahead of the East in the architectural beauty of its cities and all modern conveniences, such as electric and cable railways, electric lights, waterworks, sewerage systems, etc. The people have an air of alertness and a keenness of perception, which is not always noticeable in some of the Eastern states, where habits are more methodical and where business is transacted in a more quiet way.

•••

The News representative was a visitor to the water works and electric light plants a few evenings ago. The place shows a decided improvement in every way. Pictures adorn the walls and hanging-baskets of flowers are suspended from the ceiling, which gives the room a neat and inviting appearance. The News was most kindly received and shown through the plant by the chief engineer, Mr. Geo. Elder, and the workings of the machinery throughout were fully explained. Since Mr. Elder took charge of the plant, some two months ago, he has reduced the working expenditures of the plant by several dollars daily, and has given better service, better lights, and all in all has given entire satisfaction.

•••

In accordance with the recommendation of the President of the United States, I, Edwin B. Winans, Governor of the State of Michigan, do hereby appoint Thursday, the 24th day of November, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer. Let the people on that day refrain from secular pursuits and meet in their usual places of worship to thank God for the blessings he has bestowed, and pray for a continuance of the same. Let us remember our friends and neighbors who are less favored than ourselves, and endeavor by the exercise of true Christian charity to bring the spirit of thankfulness home to every heart.

•••

From Moran and Allenville: Paymaster Vance settled with the boys in the Martel Furnace Co’s employ on Saturday.

It is pretty generally understood that the Maccabees intend treating the people of Allenville and surroundings to a free entertainment on the eve. of Thanksgiving Day.

•••

From Les Cheneaux: We have had one of the most fashionable weddings that has ever taken place in this part of the country. The contracting parties were Miss D. B. Williams, of Chicago and Chas. Hessel, of Hessel. The marriage ceremony took place at her brother’s residence, the “Les Cheneaux Hotel,” Nov. 10th, 3 p.m., The Rev. Mr. Law officiating.

The bride was elegantly dressed in white silk, trimmed in swan’s down. The bridesmaid, Miss Maggie Mertaugh, was also very prettily dressed for the occasion. Joseph Finlen acted the part of groomsman. Dinner was served at 8 and there was no trouble spared to make this part of the program a perfect success. 96 guests were seated at this banquet. Dancing commenced at 10 and was kept up till the small hours. The Harp Orchestra, of St. Ignace, furnished the music. The brides-cake was very beautiful and was made at Conrad Bros., St. Ignace. The bride received many costly presents. We had a good time, and I hope there will be another wedding soon.

100 YEARS AGO
The St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, November 15, 1917

Another consignment of Mackinac county’s men included in the first draft has been called for Camp Custer for November 19th and will be forwarded to their destination by the local war board between that date and the 22nd. 30 per cent. of the first call, or 19 men, are included, as follows:

John White, Gros Cap; Wm. Albrecht,

St. Ignace; Wm. H. C. Wise, Pickford; Geo. A. Slater, Pickford; Owen Tuttle, Curtis; Joseph V. Cuppens, St. Ignace; Hugo F. Gille, Moran; William Moses, Charles; Robt. S. McCauley, Allenville; Otto L. Hillock, Pickford; Peter J. Pond, Rexton; Henry N. Eakley, Engadine; Glenn Hatch, Rexton; William L. Lyons, Gilchrist; Ebbny E. Cook, Gould City; Andrew S. Cowell, Pickford, Claude V. Dell, St. Ignace; Matt Keobucher, Engadine; Grover Stites, Hunts Spur.

The men will leave at 7:30 next Thursday, November 22.

With the departure of this 30 per cent., there will be left 20 per cent. of the first contingent, or 14, who are still to go. While no date has been set for their going to camp, it is expected the call will be made in December as Camp Custer is well advanced and will soon be ready for more men.

To many of the men on the above list, the call is most welcome. For the past two months they have been kept on the anxious seat and a number of them sometime ago gave up good positions in anticipation of having to leave at once.

•••

The hay dealers of the peninsula are suffering from a shortage both of hay and cars for shipment.

•••

The D. N. McLeid Lumber company, which is putting in a big lumber camp at Hendrie, has petitioned the Chippewa county school commissioners for a school at the camp. Already, according to the petition, there are 15 children who should have means of an education. Hendrie, a new camp, is on the Hendrie river and is located at the second railroad spur from Soo Junction toward St. Ignace. The company will find it difficult to keep men at the camp, which is to be a permanent one, unless there are school facilities for the children. So the company has signified its willingness to erect a school building if the county will do its part and supply a teacher and attend to the upkeep.

•••

Miss Alys Dufresne, principal of the Mackinac Island high school, was the guest of friends in the city Friday.

•••

Upper Peninsula lumbermen and other business interests requiring freight cars will suffer during the winter by reason of the shortage, which is already serious and constantly growing worse. 2045 less cars were brought across the straits in October this year as compared with the corresponding month of 1916. Lumbermen are going to be hard put to secure sufficient cars to get their cut to the mills. While there will be quite a movement of ore across the straits for Detroit and Antrim during the next 30 days, the cars used therefore are exclusive ore cars and are not fitted for general freight or logs.

•••

The officers of the Mackinac county Chapter Red Cross have been advised from Chicago headquarters that the first consignment of knitted goods sent from the chapter has been received in fine condition and that the articles are part of a consignment sent to France this month.

A rumor to the effect that goods made by the ladies of the chapter had been returned as not being properly made has been circulated, but has no foundation in fact. On the other hand, the goods sent in have all been accepted and pronounced unusually fine and among the best. There can be no better made goods than those sent in by the Mackinac chapter, and how a rumor to the effect that they were not acceptable could have found circulation is hard to understand.

•••

A two-days’ teachers’ institute for Mackinac county begins today in the LaSalle High school. Teachers from every section of the county are arriving and to all The Enterprise gives welcome and trusts that every session of the institute will be full of interest and inspiration for all attending. Profs. Larzelere and Stockwell will conduct the sessions.

•••

It was generally predicted before the opening of the deer season that by reason of the draft calling thousands of young men into the service coupled with the labor shortage that there would be fewer hunters in the woods this fall than for a number of years. The guessers appear to have all gone wrong judging from the figures now available.

Up to and including the morning trip of the Chief yesterday, November

14, 2,972 hunters had come across the straits bound for various parts of the peninsula. Up to the same time last year the number coming north to hunt was 2,784, a gain for the present season of 188.

•••

Will Light the Poor House: Ervin E. Paully of Cheboygan, who has the agency for the Delco-Light in northern Michigan, was in the city Tuesday. While here he was awarded the contract for installing this system in the new county infirmary at a cost of $450, the work to be done under the supervision of City Engineer Chas. J. Mulcrone. The special committee having in charge the work of building and furnishing the infirmary also awarded the contract to Mr. Paully for the installation of a large pump. The county house when fully completed will be as modern and comfortable as any in the north country and furnish a place where the unfortunate can be taken care of at less cost than under the present system of farming them out.

•••

From Mackinac Island: The Island community was surprised Monday on receiving the announcement of the marriage of Miss Alys Dufresne and Robert Bailey, son of Mr. Matthew Bailey. The bride was principal of the high school and on Friday went to St. Ignace, making no mention of her intended marriage, and the first anyone knew of it was by a telegram sent to President Doud of the board of education from her home near Bay City resigning her position. Mr. Bailey had accepted a position in Jacksonville, Florida, for the winter, but informed no one here that he intended to take a bride with him. The young people have the best wishes of this community for a happy married life and we all hope to be able to give them the reception here next spring which they for a time escaped.

•••

From The Snows: The Islander made a trip over Wednesday to get the school teachers to attend the annual institute meeting held at St. Ignace this week.

The H. P. Hossack Co.’s mill finished its season’s cut last week, turning out more shingles than they have in several years.

Joe Cudman and family have moved down to R. P. White’s camp on Boot Island and will board the men during the winter.

The deer season is on and George Izzard is named as the first one getting the prize.

Ned Hudson received a severe injury last week Friday when a falling limb hit him just above the eye. H. P. Hossack hurried him to Pickford in his car and Dr. Fox dressed the wound, putting in several stitches.

•••

Robert Bailey of the Island called on St. Ignace friends Friday, leaving in the evening for Daytona, Florida, where he will open a drug store.

•••

John Beveridge was down from Rexton, where he is lumbering, the first of the week looking for woodsmen. He says that if all the idle men now in the peninsula would work there would be no shortage of men, but that hundreds of them refuse to work but a few days at a time, and many of them not at all. Wages are higher than ever before known.

•••

A number of hunters from the lower part of the state arranging to camp on their former grounds have been met with signs, “No Hunting Allowed on These Premises” staring them in the face. Land owners on which are located lumbering camps are taking this precaution safe-guarding their employees.

80 YEARS AGO
The Republican-News
and St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, November 18, 1937

The greatest army of deer hunters on record invaded the upper peninsula last week end and are now prowling the forested areas searching for Michigan’s big game. Figures released Monday by Highway Commissioner Murray D. Van Wagoner substantiated advance reports that the hunting army would be far greater than last year. The figures show that 18,336 hunters entered the upper peninsula by way of the Straits during the five-day period previous to the opening of the deer season. Last year the number was 15,344.

•••

Jule Hagen, veteran hunter, was the first in St. Ignace to bag his buck on the opening day of the season. Mr. Hagen shot his 150-pound deer about 10 o’clock Monday morning in the Pte. aux Chenes vicinity.

•••

Dr. L. C. Shaftoe purchased a new Pontiac coupe Tuesday at Ray Motor Sales. It is an eight-cylinder, marooncolored model of very fine appearance.

•••

Camp Mackinac at Rexton has completed its forest tree planting program for 1937, totaling well over two million for the year, of which 1,063,500 were planted this fall. All seedlings were planted within the boundaries of the Mackinac state forest.

In addition to this effort towards reestablishment of Mackinac’s forests, the enrollees fought 8,629 hours to protect the mature timber already in the forests. These hours were spent fighting fires during the past summer. Trucks transporting fire suppression crews traveled 5,205 miles.

Three thousand acres of ground are prepared for tree planting next year. Forty-four furrows are made in each 40-acre plot, bringing the total length of the furrows laid to equal the distance from New York to Los Angeles.

•••

Fred Barker, proprietor of the Evergreen Inn at Evergreen Shores here on highway US-2 and US-31, is carrying out further improvements and enlargements in the Inn, which is believed to be Michigan’s most unique hotel.

A separate service building is under way for the housing and convenience of employees. Their former quarters in the Inn will be devoted to additional guest rooms. The dining room will be enlarged and the porches provided with open air tables for meals. In summer the entire room will be open to the cool breezes of Moran bay.

Evergreen Inn did a capacity business throughout July and August, and up to fifty cars from many states were turned away daily. Built of carefully selected logs in 1931 by Mr. Barker, the Inn is two stories in height and all guest rooms are equipped with baths, hot and cold water and toilets.

An outstanding feature of Evergreen Inn is the beautiful lobby with its great fireplace. The lobby and lounge are exact replicas on a smaller scale of those in the famous Old Trail Tavern in Yellowstone park. A large part of the Inn’s patronage is booked one year in advance by satisfied guests who return each season.

•••

From Gros Cap: The boys who attend high school in St. Ignace received good news this week. They will ride to school in the bus instead of pedaling the eight miles to town on bicycles as heretofore.

•••

From Gould City: Mrs. Joan Greenwald, age 96, and oldest resident of Mackinac county, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Gust Bentz, on Tuesday night, November 9.

Mrs. Greenwald was born in Russia, October 29, 1841.

Survivors are two sons and two daughters, Mrs. Fred Schraeder, Rappanville, Mrs. Gust Bentz, Engadine, Theodore, Gould City, and Adolph of St. Ignace.

•••

From Hessel: Mr. James J. Fenlon, the son of Mrs. James Fenlon (nee McLaughlin), and brother of our Hon. Edward H. Fenlon of St. Ignace, member of the State legislature, was one of the many successful graduates of the law department in the State University at Ann Arbor, which held its bar examination on September 20, 21, and 22.

Mr. Fenlon passed with unusually high grades in 15 out of 16 branches of the law.

His father, Mr. James Fenlon, who passed out of this earthly life 27 years ago, when James Jr., was but an infant, was one of the Fenlon Bros. at Hessel, who have so long been conducting a general store and have contributed so much to the name and fame of the village of Hessel as a lumbering and summer resort center, known especially in the latter respect in many states adjacent to Michigan, and even farther away.

•••

Use of the Straits of Mackinac as a checking point will not be extensive this year because of the traffic congestion that always develops here during the deer hunting season, the department of conservation has announced.

Last year the department shifted its scene of operations from St. Ignace to Mackinaw City, and apparently discovered that that point wasn’t satisfactory either.

•••

The Rev. Frederick W. Abicht, for over 43 years a Lutheran minister, has taken up his home at Hessel. Rev. and Mrs. Abicht and their White Spitz, “Snowball,” are comfortably situated in Mackinac county to enjoy their declining years.

Rev. Abicht preached his farewell sermon to the Trinity Lutheran congregation at Clawson, Michigan last September, and this fall came to Hessel to resume his home where he is well-known and favorably regarded by many friends.

Mr. Abicht was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., June 5, 1867, the son of August Abbott and Caroline Rosen. With his two sisters and three brothers, now all dead, he was orphaned at the age of six. The minister was christened with the old family name (Abicht) by a foster father.

Pastor Abich studied in public and parish schools and worked as a farm hand in Wood county, Ohio, from 14 to the age of 19, and he paid for his seven years at the Capital U., Columbus, Ohio, himself. He was ordained in 1894 and since served in five parishes, including a 15 year period in the large St. Paul’s Lutheran church Detroit, and charges at Sulphur Springs, Marysville, and Pemberville, Ohio, and in the upper peninsula.

While in Marysville, Ohio, Mr. Abich married Amanda Graetz, daughter of the Rev. Robert Graetz, one of 13 pioneer Lutheran ministers in northern Ohio and Michigan.

•••

The Arnold Transit Co. steamer Elva is now operating on her late fall schedule between St. Ignace and Mackinac Island. Three trips each way are made every day the weather permits…Navigation through the Snows channels is closed for the season.

•••

From Mackinac Island: Monday night the coast guard cutter Cartigan, which is stationed at Alpena, docked at the Arnold pier to collect ammunition.

Last Sunday night the theatre was not as well attended as usual and these shows will not be able to continue unless more people patronize them, so let’s try to turn out at the next show which will be held Sunday again. If we want these pictures to continue throughout the winter, let’s show it.

50 YEARS AGO
The Republican-News
and St. Ignace Enterprise
Thursday, November 16, 1967

State Representative Robert W. Davis (R-St. Ignace) has announced that the Good Roads package, containing the provision to lower the “Big Mac” bridge tolls, has gone to the Governor for his signature…

Davis, a freshman legislator, was the prime sponsor of the amendment which will channel $3.5 million annually toward retirement of the Mackinac Bridge bonds. This will allow passenger car tolls to be reduced from $3.75 to about $1.50. The toll reduction was accomplished through the efforts of Davis, fellowrepresentative Charles Varnum of the U. P.’s 107th District and 37th District Senator Thomas F. Schweigert, after similar efforts had consistently failed for a decade.

•••

Hortencia Martinez, a teen from Acapulco, is a new member of the Class of ’66 at LaSalle high school. Christened “Tencia” by classmates, she says hesitantly that she is here to “learn more English.”

•••

A community Thanksgiving Eve service is scheduled for Wednesday evening, Nov. 22, at 7:30 in the Methodist church. The Rev. Edward Fairbanks, pastor of the Assembly of God church, will be the speaker. A combined community choir will perform.

•••

Julie Nelson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Loren Nelson of St. Ignace, who has been employed with the telephone company in Anaheim, Calif., has been assigned to a six-month tour of duty as hostess in the telephone exhibit at Disneyland.

•••

Despite the fact that there is no “split” deer season in Michigan this year, it is estimated that about 30,000 vehicles carrying deer hunters will cross the Mackinac Bridge in the few days before the opening of the season next Saturday.

Last year 31,308 vehicles bearing downstate hunters crossed the bridge in the three-day period before the opening day, a slight gain over the previous year.

The army of Nimrods is expected to cart home about 10,000 deer taken from northern forests.

•••

A two-inch carpet of snow greeted St. Ignace residents Tuesday morning and snow plows were required to clear the streets.

•••

Captain John M. Austin, chief of the Third Coast Guard district’s personnel division since June 1965, is scheduled to leave for duty in Vietnam on November 27. Captain Austin will be remembered as former commander of the St. Ignace office of the Bureau of Marine inspection service.

He will act as adviser to the chief of the Naval Advisory Group in Saigon for coast guard related matters.

•••

Fred’s Gulf service station on north State St. has been closed and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Rowan and two children are moving to Flint to make their permanent residence.

•••

Robert W. LeCount has resigned as secretary-manager of the St. Ignace Area Chamber of Commerce to accept a position with Greyhound as manager of their Saginaw terminal. Mr. LeCount plans to assume his new duties on Nov. 27. He does not plan to move his family and will retain his home here for the time being.

•••

Machinist Mate Third Class John J. Vachon, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Vachon of St. Ignace, was aboard the destroyer USS Mansfield when, for the second time in 24 hours, the ship poured five-inch projectiles into an enemy camp just south of the Demilitarized Zone in the Republic of Vietnam.

•••

Army Private First Class Garth R. Jacobson, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold E. Jacobson, Gould City, was assigned to Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion in the 25th Infantry Division’s 22nd Infantry near Dau Tieng, Vietnam, October 26 as a recoilless rifleman.

•••

The High-Lair Drive-In on US-2 West, owned by Wm. and Gertrude Gotham, was sold to Lyle and Eleanor Radcliffe of Detroit. The Radcliffes now reside in St. Ignace and plan to re-open the drive-in approximately May 1.

•••

Solving the problem of overcrowding of two class rooms was thoroughly discussed Monday evening at the St. Ignace Board of Education meeting. The kindergarten will be relieved by the hiring of a full time teacher’s aide within the next two weeks. The overcrowding in the third grade at the Bertrand street school, which is taught by Mrs. Marvel Sunderlund, will be further studied at a special meeting next Monday evening.

Mrs. Sunderlund’s class with 40 pupils is the largest class in the elementary system outside of the kindergarten.

•••

Since the Mackinac Bridge opened in November of 1957, nearly 41 million persons have crossed it in 12,644,406 vehicles that have paid tolls amounting to slightly more than $53 million.

•••

From Les Cheneaux: Edward Sherlund, Kincheloe Air Force Base Fire Dept. director, is attending a month-long fire prevention technical training school at Chanute Air Force Base, Ill. This temporary duty at school includes training in fire inspections, fire sprinkling systems, and fire alarms.

The Hon. Judge George Theut, Mackinac Co. Probate Judge of St. Ignace, was the keynote speaker at the all-student assembly which climaxed the American Education Week program at Cedarville high school.

Mrs. Al Pollard was hostess at her home on Islington Point to members of Our Lady of the Snows Altar society on Thursday evening.

Fr. Wenzel was present at the meeting and stated that the new church was inspected by the Detroit architects last week and the construction is going ahead on schedule. “At a recent meeting of Bishop Noa and 24 priests, many commented on the beauty of the new Our Lady of the Snows and its perfect harmony with the new Liturgy. Many agreed, that when completed, it will be by far the most beautiful church in the Marquette Diocese,” said Fr. Wenzel.

•••

The State St. property occupied by the St. Louis Oil Co. has been sold by Frank L. Glashaw to Union Terminal Piers, Inc., of Mackinac Island. Russ St. Louis, operator of the oil station known as Russ’s Sinclair Service, says he will continue to occupy the garage. The property has been in the Glashaw family for the past 30 years. Union Terminal Piers plans to apply for permission to fill-in behind and around the property which is adjacent to their present holdings in the area.

•••

Deer hunters like straw for tent camp insulation and often haul bales north. But there are bugs in the plan this year. They can’t cross the Mackinac Bridge unless the straw or hay is accompanied by a certificate proving it has been fumigated to destroy plant pests. That’s because the lower peninsula is under cereal leaf beetle quarantine. They could drive north and buy their straw in the U.P.

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